Now showing items 1-20 of 8034

    • Tips to Help People Living with Mental Health Conditions Stop Using Tobacco Products

      Renneburg, Carol; McKay, Colleen E. (2022-10-06)
      Approximately fifty million people living in the U.S. use tobacco products. According to the Massachusetts Department of Public Health, the leading cause of preventable death and disease in the state is smoking. As of 2017, 13.7% of Massachusetts adults were current smokers, with 13.5% of white adults, 15.7% of Black adults, and 18.3% of Hispanic adults reporting smoking cigarettes.1 One study found that an average smoker may attempt to quit 30 or more times before success is achieved with abstinence from smoking for at least one year. This tip sheet provides general and evidence-based tips on how to help individuals living with mental health conditions cease using tobacco products.
    • Adulting Shorts: The “TEA” on IEPs Part 2

      Sudbrock, Emily; Gatesy-Davis, Marina (2022-09-21)
      This info-comic is for high school students to help them understand what an Individualized Educational Plan or IEP is, what transition planning is, and the importance of the student being involved in them. This is Part 2 of the story. Find Part 1 here: https://www.umassmed.edu/TransitionsACR/publication/comic/2021/09/tea-on-ieps-part-1/
    • Ultrasound in the Acute Abdomen

      Hoyer, Matt (2022-09-15)
      This presentation is part of the PEER Liberia Radiology Lecture Series. It provides an overview for clinicians of ultrasound in the acute abdomen.
    • Mucosal nanobody IgA as inhalable and affordable prophylactic and therapeutic treatment against SARS-CoV-2 and emerging variants

      Li, Qi; Humphries, Fiachra; Girardin, Roxie C; Wallace, Aaron; Ejemel, Monir; Amcheslavsky, Alla; McMahon, Conor T; Schiller, Zachary A; Ma, Zepei; Cruz, John; et al. (2022-09-12)
      Anti-COVID antibody therapeutics have been developed but not widely used due to their high cost and escape of neutralization from the emerging variants. Here, we describe the development of VHH-IgA1.1, a nanobody IgA fusion molecule as an inhalable, affordable and less invasive prophylactic and therapeutic treatment against SARS-CoV-2 Omicron variants. VHH-IgA1.1 recognizes a conserved epitope of SARS-CoV-2 spike protein Receptor Binding Domain (RBD) and potently neutralizes major global SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern (VOC) including the Omicron variant and its sub lineages BA.1.1, BA.2 and BA.2.12.1. VHH-IgA1.1 is also much more potent against Omicron variants as compared to an IgG Fc fusion construct, demonstrating the importance of IgA mediated mucosal protection for Omicron infection. Intranasal administration of VHH-IgA1.1 prior to or after challenge conferred significant protection from severe respiratory disease in K18-ACE2 transgenic mice infected with SARS-CoV-2 VOC. More importantly, for cost-effective production, VHH-IgA1.1 produced in Pichia pastoris had comparable potency to mammalian produced antibodies. Our study demonstrates that intranasal administration of affordably produced VHH-IgA fusion protein provides effective mucosal immunity against infection of SARS-CoV-2 including emerging variants.
    • Examining Pregnant Veterans' Acceptance and Beliefs Regarding the COVID-19 Vaccine

      Mattocks, Kristin M.; Kroll-Desrosiers, Aimee R.; Moore Simas, Tiffany A.; Bastian, Lori A; Marteeny, Valerie; Walker, Lorrie; Sheahan, Kate; Elwy, A Rani (2022-08-30)
      Background: Pregnant persons have received mixed messages regarding whether or not to receive COVID-19 vaccines as limited data are available regarding vaccine safety for pregnant and lactating persons and breastfeeding infants. Objective: The aims of this study were to examine pregnant Veteran's acceptance of COVID-19 vaccines, along with perceptions and beliefs regarding vaccine safety and vaccine conspiracy beliefs. Design and participants: We conducted a cross-sectional survey of pregnant Veterans enrolled in VA care who were taking part in an ongoing cohort study at 15 VA medical centers between January and May 2021. Main measures: Pregnant Veterans were asked whether they had been offered the COVID-19 vaccine during pregnancy, and whether they chose to accept or refuse it. Additional questions focused on perceptions of COVID-19 vaccine safety and endorsements of vaccine knowledge and conspiracy beliefs. Logistic regression was utilized to examine predictors of acceptance of a vaccine during pregnancy. Key results: Overall, 72 pregnant Veterans were offered a COVID-19 vaccine during pregnancy; over two-thirds (69%) opted not to receive a vaccine. Reasons for not receiving a vaccine included potential effects on the baby (64%), side effects for oneself (30%), and immunity from a past COVID-19 infection (12%). Those who received a vaccine had significantly greater vaccine knowledge and less belief in vaccine conspiracy theories. Greater knowledge of vaccines in general (aOR: 1.78; 95% CI: 1.2-2.6) and lower beliefs in vaccine conspiracies (aOR: 0.76; 95% CI: 0.6-0.9) were the strongest predictors of acceptance of a COVID-19 vaccine during pregnancy. Conclusions: Our study provides important insights regarding pregnant Veterans' decisions to accept the COVID-19 vaccine, and reasons why they may choose not to accept the vaccine. Given the high endorsement of vaccine conspiracy beliefs, trusted healthcare providers should have ongoing, open discussions about vaccine conspiracy beliefs and provide additional information to dispel these beliefs.
    • Lay Beliefs About Doctors' Knowledge of and Reasons for Recommending COVID-19 Vaccines

      Fisher, Kimberly A; Nguyen, Ngoc; Mazor, Kathleen M (2022-08-29)
      Commonly cited as the most trusted source of information about COVID-19 vaccines, healthcare providers have an important role in promoting COVID-19 vaccination While a healthcare provider recommendation is associated with greater likelihood of being vaccinated against COVID-193, there is limited understanding of lay beliefs about providers’ knowledge of COVID-19 vaccines and reasons for promoting vaccination.
    • Trends in Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) Seroprevalence in Massachusetts Estimated from Newborn Screening Specimens

      Ma, Kevin C; Hale, Jaime E; Grad, Yonatan H; Alter, Galit; Luzuriaga, Katherine; Eaton, Roger B; Fischinger, Stephanie; Kaur, Devinder; Brody, Robin; Siddiqui, Sameed M; et al. (2022-08-24)
      Background: Estimating the cumulative incidence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is essential for setting public health policies. We leveraged deidentified Massachusetts newborn screening specimens as an accessible, retrospective source of maternal antibodies for estimating statewide seroprevalence in a nontest-seeking population. Methods: We analyzed 72 117 newborn specimens collected from November 2019 through December 2020, representing 337 towns and cities across Massachusetts. Seroprevalence was estimated for the Massachusetts population after correcting for imperfect test specificity and nonrepresentative sampling using Bayesian multilevel regression and poststratification. Results: Statewide seroprevalence was estimated to be 0.03% (90% credible interval [CI], 0.00-0.11) in November 2019 and rose to 1.47% (90% CI: 1.00-2.13) by May 2020, following sustained SARS-CoV-2 transmission in the spring. Seroprevalence plateaued from May onward, reaching 2.15% (90% CI: 1.56-2.98) in December 2020. Seroprevalence varied substantially by community and was particularly associated with community percent non-Hispanic Black (β = .024; 90% CI: 0.004-0.044); i.e., a 10% increase in community percent non-Hispanic Black was associated with 27% higher odds of seropositivity. Seroprevalence estimates had good concordance with reported case counts and wastewater surveillance for most of 2020, prior to the resurgence of transmission in winter. Conclusions: Cumulative incidence of SARS-CoV-2 protective antibody in Massachusetts was low as of December 2020, indicating that a substantial fraction of the population was still susceptible. Maternal seroprevalence data from newborn screening can inform longitudinal trends and identify cities and towns at highest risk, particularly in settings where widespread diagnostic testing is unavailable.
    • Investigating Proteolytic Processing of Ataxin 2, a Neurodegenerative Disease Associated Protein

      Chitre, Monika (2022-08-08)
      Ataxin 2 (ATXN2) is a ubiquitously expressed mRNA binding protein involved in the development and progression of spinocerebellar ataxia 2 (SCA2) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In the context of both neurodegenerative diseases, its N-terminal polyglutamine (polyQ) domain is mutated and expanded in length. Several other polyQ proteins, such as huntingtin (Htt), ataxin 3 (ATXN3), and ataxin 7 (ATXN7), undergo proteolytic processing that produces toxic fragments containing their polyQ domains. Investigating how ATXN2 is regulated by proteolysis is hindered by the lack of available molecular biological tools such as N-terminal ATXN2 antibodies to target and analyze the endogenous N-terminus of ATXN2. To circumvent this challenge, I developed a transient overexpression model of N-terminally tagged ATXN2 in HEK293E cells. Here, I demonstrate that both wild-type and mutant ATXN2 are targets of N-terminal proteolysis. I confirmed that ATXN2 produces an independent polyQ cleavage fragment like other polyQ proteins through basic molecular biology approaches such as Western blotting and immunoprecipitation. Additionally, I identified the specific region that is both necessary and sufficient for cleavage to occur via deletion mapping with multiple truncated ATXN2 mutants and reporter constructs. Further definition of ATXN2 as a target of proteolytic cleavage aligns it with other neurodegenerative polyQ proteins, and proteolysis is currently a less explored avenue of research for ATXN2-related disease development, progression, and therapeutic modalities. This work reveals a novel site that directs cleavage of ATXN2 and provides a potential avenue of investigation for how ATXN2 posttranslational modifications contribute to the progression of SCA2 and ALS.
    • UMCCTS Newsletter, August 2022

      UMass Center for Clinical and Translational Science (2022-08-04)
      This is the August 2022 issue of the UMass Center for Clinical and Translational Science Newsletter containing news and events of interest.
    • Journal of eScience Librarianship (JeSLIB) Publishing Process

      Raboin, Regina Fisher (2022-08-02)
      Describes the roles and responsibilities, author guidelines, and peer review process for the Journal of eScience Librarianship.
    • Healthcare use in commercially insured youth with mental health disorders

      Hugunin, Julie; Davis, Maryann; Larkin, Celine; Baek, Jonggyu; Skehan, Brian; Lapane, Kate L (2022-07-26)
      Background: The objective of this study is to describe age-related patterns of outpatient healthcare utilization in youth and young adults with mental health disorders. Method: We used the IBM® MarketScan® Commercial Database to identify 359,413 youth and young adults (12-27 years) with a mental health disorder continuously enrolled in private health insurance in 2018. Exploratory analysis was used to describe patterns of outpatient healthcare use (e.g., primary, reproductive, mental health care) and therapeutic management (e.g., medication prescriptions, psychotherapy) by age. Period prevalence and median number of visits are reported. Additional analysis explored utilization patterns by mental health disorder. Results: The prevalence of outpatient mental health care and primary care decreased with age, with a larger drop in primary care utilization. While 74.0-78.4% of those aged 12-17 years used both outpatient mental health care and primary care, 53.1-59.7% of those aged 18-27 years did. Most 18-19-year-olds had a visit with an internal medicine or family medicine specialist, a minority had a pediatrician visit. The prevalence of medication management increased with age, while the prevalence of psychotherapy decreased. Conclusions: Taken together, this descriptive study illustrates age-related differences in outpatient healthcare utilization among those with mental health disorders. Additionally, those with the most severe mental health disorders seem to be least connected to outpatient care. This knowledge can inform efforts to improve utilization of healthcare across the transition to adulthood.
    • International Controlled Study of Revascularization and Outcomes Following COVID-Positive Mechanical Thrombectomy

      Dmytriw, Adam A.; Kuhn, Anna L.; Puri, Ajit S.; Jabbour, Pascal (2022-07-12)
      BACKGROUND: Previous studies suggest that the mechanisms and outcomes in COVID-19-associated stroke differ from those with non-COVID-19 strokes, but there is limited comparative evidence focusing on these populations. Therefore, we aimed to determine if a significant association exists between COVID-19 status with revascularization and functional outcomes following thrombectomy for large vessel occlusion (LVO), after adjustment for potential confounding factors. METHODS: A cross-sectional, international multicenter retrospective study of consecutively admitted COVID-19 patients with concomitant acute LVO, compared to a control group without COVID-19. Data collected included age, gender, comorbidities, clinical characteristics, details of the involved vessels, procedural technique, and various outcomes. A multivariable adjusted analysis was conducted. RESULTS: In this cohort of 697 patients with acute LVO, 302 had COVID-19 while 395 patients did not. There was a significant difference (p < 0.001) in the mean age (in years) and gender of patients, with younger patients and more males in the COVID-19 group. In terms of favorable revascularization (mTICI 3), COVID-19 was associated with lower odds of complete revascularization [OR=0.33; 95% CI=0.23-0.48; p < 0.001], which persisted on multivariable modelling with adjustment for other predictors [aOR=0.30; 95% CI=0.12-0.77; p=0.012]. Moreover, endovascular complications, in-hospital mortality, and length of hospital stay were significantly higher among COVID-19 patients (p < 0.001). CONCLUSION: COVID-19 was an independent predictor of incomplete revascularization and poor functional outcome in patients with stroke due to LVO. Furthermore, COVID-19 patients with LVO were more often younger and suffered higher morbidity/mortality rates.
    • Data and Code from "Show me the data! Data sharing practices demonstrated in published research at the University of Massachusetts Chan Medical School"

      Grynoch, Tess (2022-07-11)
      Data extracted from articles published by UMass Chan researchers to determine where and how data was being shared. Code from the analysis is also included.
    • UMCCTS Newsletter, July 2022

      UMass Center for Clinical and Translational Science (2022-07-11)
      This is the July 2022 issue of the UMass Center for Clinical and Translational Science Newsletter containing news and events of interest.
    • COVID-19: a gray swan's impact on the adoption of novel medical technologies

      Dunlap, Denise; Santos, Roberto S.; Lilly, Craig M.; Teebagy, Sean; Hafer, Nathaniel S.; Buchholz, Bryan O.; McManus, David D. (2022-07-08)
      The COVID-19 pandemic offers a unique context and opportunity to investigate changes in healthcare professional perceptions towards the adoption of novel medical technologies, such as point-of-care technologies (POCTs). POCTs are a nascent technology that has experienced rapid growth as a result of COVID-19 due to their ability to increase healthcare accessibility via near-patient delivery, including at-home. We surveyed healthcare professionals before and during COVID-19 to explore whether the pandemic altered their perceptions about the usefulness of POCTs. Our network analysis method provided a structure for understanding this changing phenomenon. We uncovered that POCTs are not only useful for diagnosing COVID-19, but healthcare professionals also perceive them as increasingly important for diagnosing other diseases, such as cardiovascular, endocrine, respiratory, and metabolic diseases. Healthcare professionals also viewed POCTs as facilitating the humanization of epidemiology by improving disease management/monitoring and strengthening the clinician-patient relationship. As the accuracy and integration of these technologies into mainstream healthcare delivery improves, hurdles to their adoption dissipate, thereby encouraging healthcare professionals to rely upon them more frequently to diagnose, manage, and monitor diseases. The technological advances made in POCTs during COVID-19, combined with shifting positive perceptions of their utility by healthcare professionals, may better prepare us for the next pandemic.
    • Racial differences in the association of accelerated aging with future cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality: the coronary artery risk development in young adults study, 2007-2018

      Forrester, Sarah N; Zmora, Rachel; Schreiner, Pamela J; Jacobs, David R; Roger, Veronique L; Thorpe, Roland J; Kiefe, Catarina I (2022-07-01)
      Objective: Variability of Cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, including racial difference, is not fully accounted for by the variability of traditional CVD risk factors. We used a multiple biomarker model as a framework to explore known racial differences in CVD burden. Design: We measured associations between accelerated aging (AccA) measured by a combination of biomarkers, and cardiovascular morbidity and all-cause mortality using data from the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults study (CARDIA). AccA was defined as the difference between biological age, calculated using biomarkers with the Klemera and Doubal method, and chronological age. Using logistic regression, we assessed overall and race-specific associations between AccA, CVD, and all-cause mortality. Results: Among our cohort of 2959 Black or White middle-aged adults, after adjustment, a one-year increase in AccA was associated with increased odds of CVD (Odds Ratio (OR) = 1.04; 95% CI: 1.02, 1.06), stroke (OR = 1.12; 95% CI: 1.07, 1.17), and all-cause mortality (OR = 1.05; 95% CI: 1.02, 1.08). We did not find significant overall racial differences, but we did find race by sex differences where Black men differed markedly from White men in the strength of association with CVD (OR = 1.06, 95% CI: 1.01, 1.12). Conclusions: We provide evidence that AccA is associated with future CVD.
    • Gliotransmission Orchestrates Neuronal Type-specific Axon Regeneration

      Wang, Fei (2022-06-30)
      Why closely related neuronal types differ in their axon regenerative abilities remains elusive. Here, I demonstrate gliotransmission determines such a difference in Drosophila larval sensory neurons. Axotomy activates ensheathing glia, which signal to regenerative neurons through the gliotransmitter adenosine, to mount regenerative programs including neuronal activity and Ras. Surprisingly, ensheathing glia do not signal to non-regenerative neurons. Such neuronal type-specific responses to gliotransmission result from specific expression of adenosine receptors in regenerative neurons. Disrupting gliotransmission impedes regeneration of regenerative neurons. Strikingly, reconstitution of gliotransmission in non-regenerative neurons enables them to regenerate. Furthermore, activation of an adenosine receptor in adult mice promotes both regeneration and survival of retinal ganglion cells, uncovering a conserved pro-regenerative role of adenosine receptors. My studies demonstrate gliotransmission as a novel mechanism by which glia instruct axon regeneration, with neuronal type-specificity, and suggest targeting purinergic signaling as a new strategy for mammalian central nervous system repair.
    • The Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on the Clubhouse Model

      McKay, Colleen E.; Corcoran, Joel D (2022-06-29)
      The COVID-19 pandemic posed challenges to the traditional Clubhouse Model of Psychosocial Rehabilitation (Clubhouse). The COVID-19 pandemic forced many Clubhouses around the world to rapidly pivot from face-to-face services and support programs at the Clubhouse to hybrid or virtual services. The Clubhouse community quickly mobilized to establish new structures to maintain connections with Clubhouse members and provide them with essential supports. This brief describes adaptations that Clubhouses made during the COVID-19 pandemic. We also describe supports offered by Clubhouse International to inform their international network about innovative approaches and best practices for Clubhouses during the COVID-19 pandemic.
    • Th2 to Th1 Transition Is Required for Induction of Skin Lesions in an Inducible and Recurrent Murine Model of Cutaneous Lupus-Like Inflammation

      Haddadi, Nazgol-Sadat; Mande, Purvi; Brodeur, Tia Y; Hao, Kaiyuan; Ryan, Grace E; Moses, Stephanie; Subramanian, Sharon; Picari, Xhuliana; Afshari, Khashayar; Marshak-Rothstein, Ann; et al. (2022-06-27)
      Cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) is an autoimmune skin disease characterized by a strong IFN signature, normally associated with type I IFNs. However, increasing evidence points to an additional role for IFNγ, or at least a pathogenic T effector subset dependent on IFNγ, for disease progression. Nevertheless, Th2 effector subsets have also been implicated in CLE. We have now assessed the role of specific T cell subsets in the initiation and persistence of skin disease using a T cell-inducible murine model of CLE, dependent on KJ1-26 T cell recognition of an ovalbumin fusion protein. We found that only Th2-skewed cells, and not Th1-skewed cells, induced the development of skin lesions. However, we provide strong evidence that the Th2 disease-initiating cells convert to a more Th1-like functional phenotype in vivo by the time the skin lesions are apparent. This phenotype is maintained and potentiates over time, as T cells isolated from the skin, following a second induction of self-antigen, expressed more IFN-γ than T cells isolated at the time of the initial response. Transcriptional analysis identified additional changes in the KJ1-26 T cells at four weeks post injection, with higher expression levels of interferon stimulated genes (ISGs) including CXCL9, IRF5, IFIH1, and MX1. Further, injection of IFN-γ-/- T cells faied to induce skin disease in mice. We concluded that Th2 cells trigger skin lesion formation in CLE, and these cells switch to a Th1-like phenotype in the context of a TLR7-driven immune environment that is stable within the T cell memory compartment.
    • Super large-bore ingestion of clot (SLIC) leads to high first pass effect in thrombectomy for large vessel occlusion

      Massari, Francesco; Dabus, Guilherme; Cortez, Gustavo M.; Singh, Jasmeet; Kuhn, Anna L.; Naragum, Varun; Anagnostakou, Vania; Hanel, Ricardo A.; Gounis, Matthew J.; Puri, Ajit S. (2022-06-22)
      BACKGROUND: Super large-bore aspiration (SLBA) has shown high rates of complete clot ingestion. OBJECTIVE: To report the initial clinical feasibility, safety, and efficacy of this novel SLBA insert combination-super large-bore ingestion of clot (SLIC) technique for stroke. METHODS: We performed a retrospective review of three comprehensive stroke center databases. The SLIC technique entails a triaxial assembly of an 8 Fr 0.106'' Base Camp catheter, 0.088'' catheter extender (HiPoint), and an insert catheter (Tenzing 8) that completely consumes the inner diameter of the 0.088'' SLBA catheter. The HiPoint catheter is delivered over the Tenzing 8 to the face of the embolus, which is withdrawn, while aspirating through the Base Camp and HiPoint catheters as a single assembly. RESULTS: Thirty-three consecutive patients with large vessel occlusion were treated with SLIC. The median age was 70 years (30-91) and 17 were male (51.5%). The median presenting National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score and Alberta Stroke Program Early CT score was 21 (1-34) and 8 (5-10), respectively. There was 100% success in delivering the 0.088'' catheter to the site of the occlusion. The successful revascularization rate (modified Thrombolysis in Cerebral Infarction (mTICI) score > /=2B) was 100% within a single pass in most cases (82%). Final mTICI > /=2C was achieved in 94.1% of occlusions, with 73.5% mTICI 3 recanalization. The rate of first pass effect in achieving excellent reperfusion (mTICI > /=2C) was 70.5%. There were no adverse events or postprocedural symptomatic hemorrhages. CONCLUSIONS: Our initial experience with the SLIC technique resulted in achieving a first pass effect (mTICI > /=2C) in 70.5%. Navigation of the SLBA catheter extender over the Tenzing insert was successful and safe in this early experience.