• 2013 State of the Science Conference Proceedings: Tools for System Transformation for Young Adults with Psychiatric Disabilities

      Davis, Maryann (2014-03-25)
      In 2013, the Learning and Working During the Transition to Adulthood Rehabilitation Research & Training Center, UMass Chan Medical School, successfully conducted a state of the science conference, “Tools for System Transformation for Young Adults with Psychiatric Disabilities.” The conference was held at Georgetown University National Technical Assistance Center for Children’s Mental Health on September 24-25th, 2013. We had two goals for this conference. Our first goal was to share and discuss the current state of research knowledge regarding practice and policy supports for strong educational and employment outcomes in young adults (ages 18-30) with psychiatric disabilities. Our second goal was to engage all attendees in prioritizing the knowledge that future research should address, to guide these systems’ efforts, to better launch and support these young adults’ long-term careers. The proceedings herein include all conference papers and responses as well as final considerations for the future research directions in education, employment and policy and practice. For more information, please visit our website: https://umassmed.edu/TransitionsACR/publication/conferences/state_of_the_science_conference/
    • 2018 State-of-the-Science Conference Proceedings: Executive Summary

      Davis, Maryann (2019-02-22)
      This is the Executive Summary for the Learning and Working During the Transition to Adulthood Rehabilitation Research & Training Center's 2018 State-of-the-Science Conference Proceedings. For more information and the full conference proceedings, please visit our website at https://umassmed.edu/TransitionsACR/publication/conferences/state_of_the_science_conference/".
    • 5 Simple Ways to Create More Accessible Social Media Content

      Wnuk, Jean (2021-07-22)
      Principles of accessibility are not limited to physical spaces (such as stairs or curbs) – the same principles apply to online content, including social media sites. If you are using social media as a channel to distribute your research and content, the following are reasons why your social media content should be made accessible: It is easy to do and the right thing to do This will increase access of your research to people with disabilities You will be abiding by Title III of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) In this tip sheet we share with you five simple ways to make your social media posts as widely accessible as possible.
    • 5 Tips to Treating Women with Perinatal Depression

      Byatt, Nancy; Biebel, Kathleen; Debordes-Jackson, Gifty; Friedman, Liz (2020-05-27)
      Approximately 1 in 7 women experience perinatal depression, a depressive episode that occurs during pregnancy or within the first year after delivery or adoption. This tip sheet has 5 ways health care providers can help women who are experiencing perinatal depression. This tip sheet is based off of Listening to Mothers: What's Helpful for Mothers Experiencing Perinatal Depression.
    • A Jail Diversion Program for Veterans with Co-Occuring Disorders: MISSION - DIRECT VET

      Christopher, Paul P. (2010-02-01)
      The Massachusetts Department of Mental Health, in partnership with investigators from the University of Massachusetts Medical School, the Veterans Administration, and numerous state agencies, have developed MISSION DIRECT VET, a court-based jail diversion program with a priority population of veterans. Goals of this SAMHSA-funded program include identifying criminal defendants who are veterans with mental illness and substance use disorders prior to sentencing, proposing service and treatment option as alternatives to incarceration, and facilitating service coordination between treatment providers and the criminal justice system. This Issue Brief describes this initiative.
    • A Jail Diversion Program for Veterans with Co-occurring Disorders: MISSION - DIRECT VET [English and Spanish versions]

      Christopher, Paul; Fisher, William H.; Foti, Mary Ellen; Fulwiler, Carl E.; Grudzinskas, Albert J. Jr.; Hartwell, Stephanie W.; Smelson, David A.; Pinals, Debra (2013-01-01)
      MISSION DIRECT VET (Maintaining Independence and Sobriety through Systems Integration, Outreach, and Networking Diversion & Recovery for Traumatized Veterans, “MDV”) is a study funded by a grant from SAMHSA to the Massachusetts Department of Mental Health (DMH) being conducted by UMass Medical School, UMass Boston, the Veterans Administration, the DMH, and other state agencies. This court-based diversion program serves Massachusetts veterans with trauma-related mental health and substance use problems. A Spanish translation of this publication is available for download.
    • Accessibility 101: A Researcher’s Guide to Making Content Accessible

      Murray, Alexandra (2021-04-29)
      What is accessibility? Accessibility refers to whether a product or service is usable by all regardless of disability status. Principles of accessibility are not limited to physical spaces (such as stairs or curbs) – the same principles apply to websites and public facing documents. There are guidelines to follow to make documents, web pages, presentations, products, and research findings more accessible to people with disabilities. This tip sheet offers an introduction to accessibility and will be followed by tip sheets that focus on specifics. Visit the CeKTER website.
    • Adapting and Testing the Feasibility of a Prenatal Intervention for Low-Income Parents [English and Spanish versions]

      Byatt, Nancy; Perry_Jenkins, Maureen (2018-01-01)
      Learn about a new pilot study that aims to improve the mental health and co-parenting relationships of underserved, low-income parents and their partners. Adapting and Testing the Feasibility of a Prenatal Intervention for Low-Income Parents will adapt and test the feasibility of a group-based intervention called Choices in Childbirth & Co-Parenting (3CP) aimed at reducing depression and stress among low-income new mothers and their partners early in pregnancy. Funded by the UMASS Medical School Center for Clinical and Translational Science (UMCCTS) this pilot project is a collaborative effort among UMass Amherst, UMass Medical School, Square One, and the Children’s Trust. A Spanish translation of this publication is available for download.
    • Addressing Tobacco through Organizational Change (ATTOC)

      Ziedonis, Douglas M.; Baker, Sarah A. (2011-01-01)
      Describes the Addressing Tobacco through Organizational Change (ATTOC) intervention that provides services and ongoing support for agencies and organizations that are interested in learning how to initiate, improve, and or provide treatment for tobacco addiction; reduce tobacco addiction amongst employees; restrict or eliminate tobacco use on campus; and change the work environment to promote health and wellness. Originally published as: Research in the Works, Issue 1, 2011.
    • Addressing Tobacco Use in Adult Mental Health Service Programs

      McKay, Colleen E.; Ziedonis, Douglas M.; Seward, Gregory; Williams, Valerie; Bradley, Kevin; Colburn, Jennifer; Rocheleau, David (2009-10-01)
      People with Severe Mental Illness (SMI) consume nearly half of all tobacco sold in the US (Lasser, Boyd, Woolhander, Himmelstein, McCormick, & Bor, 2000). Compared to the general population, individuals diagnosed with SMI are at greater risk of co-morbid health problems and premature death (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2002; National Association of State Mental Health Program Directors, 2006). Often individuals with SMI are unaware of supportive services such as Quitlines, Nicotine Anonymous (NIC-A) meetings, and/ or Nicotine Replacement Therapy (NRT). To compound matters, many states have cut tobacco cessation funding, and few mental health programs provide integrated approaches to tobacco cessation. Programs lack trained staff or peers to assist people with SMI who wish to quit or to learn about the harmful consequences of tobacco use (e.g. cigarettes, cigars, or chewing tobacco). However, evidence suggests that people with SMI can be successful in quitting. This Issue Brief describes our efforts to engage this population in tobacco cessation activities.
    • Adolescent Mental Health Gender Differences in Arrest Onset and Risk

      Davis, Maryann; Fisher, William H.; Banks, Steven M.; Gershenson, Bernice (2008-01-01)
    • Adulting Is Hard: Understanding the College-to-Career Transition and Supporting Young Adults’ Emotional Wellbeing

      Golden, Laura; Moser, Jade; Vella-Riplee, Aimee; MacPhee, John; Schwartz, Victor; Levin, Len; Biebel, Kathleen (2020-12-09)
      The transition from college to career includes many challenges, such as adjusting to a professional environment, the high costs of student loan repayment and independent living, and changes in social support networks. Many of these challenges affect a young person’s emotional wellbeing; however, limited attention has been paid in the literature or at the practice level to the emotional wellbeing of college graduates as they transition from college to career. To address this underrecognized issue, investigators from The Jed Foundation (JED), a leading nonprofit organization with a mission to protect the emotional health and prevent suicide among teens and young adults, and the Transitions to Adulthood Center for Research (Transitions ACR) at the University of Massachusetts Medical School collaborated on a study to better understand the experiences of young adults during the college-to-career transition and how these experiences effect emotional wellbeing. Download the full College to Career: Supporting Mental Health report here.
    • Adulting Shorts: An Interview Tale, PART 1

      ACR, Transitions (2020-09-25)
      Part 1 of the Transitions to Adulthood Center for Research's An Interview Tale Comic demonstrates questions that an interviewer can and cannot ask someone during an interview. Please see our tip sheet, Do I Tell My Boss?: Disclosing My Mental Health Condition at Work for more information.
    • Adulting Shorts: An Interview Tale, PART 2

      ACR, Transitions (2020-09-29)
      Part 2 of the Transitions to Adulthood Center for Research's An Interview Tale Comic depicts questions in an interview that a young adult may encounter. Please see our tip sheet, Do I Tell My Boss?: Disclosing My Mental Health Condition at Work for more information. Part 1 of An Interview Tale is here.
    • Adulting Shorts: The “TEA” on IEPS Part 1

      ACR, Transitions (2021-09-29)
      This info-comic is for high school students to help them understand what an Individualized Educational Plan or IEP is, what transition planning is, and the importance of the student being involved in them. This info-comic is based on work by the Translating Evidence to Support Transitions (TEST) team (NIDILRR Grant number 90DP0080). Find out more about this project on the project’s website. Read the Teens on IEPs tip sheet. Read the You Got This: Taking a Leadership Role in Your IEP Meeting tip sheet. Artwork by Marina Gatesy-Davis View the info-comic transcript.
    • Adulting Shorts: The “TEA” on IEPs Part 2

      Sudbrock, Emily; Gatesy-Davis, Marina (2022-09-21)
      This info-comic is for high school students to help them understand what an Individualized Educational Plan or IEP is, what transition planning is, and the importance of the student being involved in them. This is Part 2 of the story. Find Part 1 here: https://www.umassmed.edu/TransitionsACR/publication/comic/2021/09/tea-on-ieps-part-1/
    • Advancing Employment for Secondary Learners with Disabilities through CTE Policy and Practice

      McKay, Colleen E.; Ellison, Marsha Langer; Narkewicz, Emma L (2022-04-28)
      The Data tables for the figures in Advancing Employment for Secondary Learners with Disabilities through CTE Policy and Practice brief are available to download under "Additional Files" below. The Strengthening Career and Technical Education (CTE) for the 21st Century Act (Perkins V, P.L. 115-224) provides new opportunities for states to serve learners with disabilities in CTE. Perkins V specifies that learners with special population status, including learners with disabilities, need to be prepared for high-wage, high-skill, in-demand employment opportunities or post-secondary education. Perkins V requires state and local leaders to describe how CTE will be made available to learners with special population status and provides flexible funding and policy levers to achieve that goal. Even though Perkins V is in the early stages of implementation (the law went into full effect on July 1, 2020), states can leverage facets of the new law to address the challenges of supporting CTE access and success among learners with disabilities. Perkins V emphasizes supporting learners with special population status, giving states an opportunity to: Build upon prior equity work to provide greater access to CTE among learners with disabilities. To restructure systems and policies to better support these learners. To explore how this opportunity has been used by states in their Perkin V plans, UMass Chan Medical School partnered with Advance CTE to survey State CTE Directors for secondary education. This brief summarizes survey results, provides state examples, and offers policy and programmatic considerations.
    • Advancing the Provision of Mental Health Services and Supports on College and University Campuses: Toolkit and Resource Guide

      2018-11-01
      The purpose of this Toolkit and Resource Guide is to provide a framework for US-based colleges and universities to advance their approach to mental health services and supports to their students. At a time when student demand for mental health services and supports has never been greater, so, too, has the challenge never been greater for universities to find ways to keep pace with this demand. In practice for colleges and universities, this means re-thinking their approach to mental health service and support provision, identifying areas of improvement with respect to how current systems are structured, examining novel ways of providing mental health services and supports, and finding new opportunities for collaboration beyond traditional individual counseling. This Toolkit and Resource Guide aims to support colleges and universities in this important journey. The Toolkit contains the following modules, which each examine a different aspect of this journey. Disclaimer: The content of this publication does not necessarily reflect the views, opinions or policies of the Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS), the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) or the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), and the inclusion of information about campus programs and select resources does not constitute official endorsement of the programs and resources. This publication was produced for the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration (SAMHSA). It was prepared by Social Solutions International, Inc. under contract HHSP233201700193A.
    • Annotated Bibliography: State-of-the-Science Conference Proceedings

      Davis, Maryann; Golden, Laura (2018-06-15)
      This annotated bibliography highlights publications relevant to school and work supports for youth and young adults with serious mental health conditions that were published after 2013 through early 2018. Selected publications are limited to those specifically addressing serious mental health conditions; literature related to other disability groups is not included. This bibliography is intended to supplement the Learning and Working During the Transition to Adulthood RRTC’s (L&W RRTC) previous State of the Science Paper (2013). We have also provided executive summaries from our 2013 State-of-the-Science Conference. To see the 2018 SoS conference proceedings please visit, https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/pib/vol16/iss8/1. To see the proceedings from the 2013 conference, please visit: https://umassmed.edu/TransitionsACR/publication/conferences/state_of_the_science_conference/