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dc.contributor.authorAssefa, Martha
dc.contributor.authorBarnosky, Pat
dc.contributor.authorBeaulieu, Michelle
dc.contributor.authorBorg, Amy
dc.contributor.authorBurns, Casey
dc.contributor.authorCawley, Marguerite
dc.contributor.authorDe Jordy, Jennifer
dc.contributor.authorHarvey, Daina
dc.contributor.authorHopkins, Kelsey
dc.contributor.authorHunt, Sue
dc.contributor.authorJaber Gauvin, Joanne
dc.contributor.authorJenkins, Isabelle
dc.contributor.authorLawrence, Eliza
dc.contributor.authorMarinescu, Anna
dc.contributor.authorMay, Mackenzie
dc.contributor.authorPlata-Nino, Gina
dc.contributor.authorSliwoski, Grace
dc.contributor.authorSaltsman, Adam
dc.date2022-08-11T08:08:05.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T15:41:51Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T15:41:51Z
dc.date.issued2019-03-22
dc.date.submitted2019-04-01
dc.identifier.doi10.13028/f35e-5v97
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/26732
dc.description.abstractResearch suggests that there are many benefits of school gardens for students, teachers and community. Not only can they help children eat more fruits and vegetables and be more physically active, they can help to create learning opportunities and increase teacher satisfaction. In Worcester, Massachusetts, a city with high poverty and food insecurity rates, a broad community coalition formed to brainstorm novel implementation models to improve the use and sustainability of school gardens. The group decided to foster new collaborations among higher education, K-12 schools and community organizations. The innovative idea was that higher education could meet their need for real-world application of various curricula, such as education, business, urban agriculture, marketing, horticulture, sustainable development, and engineering, through the implementation of school gardens. The resulting conference called AGES (Academic Gardening to Enrich our Students) united school teachers, professors, administration and community partners. The sessions featured information on: 1) successful models of higher education-K12 school garden partnerships, 2) building school gardening into the curriculum (psychosocial skills, STEM, environmental sciences, project-based learning, nutrition, healthy lifestyles), 3) research evidence on the benefits of school gardens, 4) strategies for building community through gardening, and 5) garden planning and maintenance. US Representative Jim McGovern was the keynote speaker, highlighting the importance of this collaborative work.
dc.formatflash_audio
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.rightsCopyright the Author(s)
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/
dc.subjectschool gardens
dc.subjectfood insecurity
dc.subjectAGES (Academic Gardening to Enrich our Students)
dc.subjectWorcester
dc.subjectAgricultural Education
dc.subjectCivic and Community Engagement
dc.subjectCommunity-Based Research
dc.subjectCommunity Health and Preventive Medicine
dc.subjectEducation
dc.subjectElementary Education
dc.subjectFood Security
dc.subjectHigher Education
dc.subjectPublic Health Education and Promotion
dc.subjectSecondary Education
dc.subjectTranslational Medical Research
dc.titleNext Steps from a School Gardening Partnership Conference (AGES: Academic Gardening to Enrich our Students): Expanding the Impact of School Gardens Through Higher Education, K-12 School and Community Coalitions
dc.typePoster
dc.identifier.legacyfulltexthttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1156&context=chr_symposium&unstamped=1
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/chr_symposium/2019/posters/11
dc.identifier.contextkey14154621
refterms.dateFOA2022-08-24T03:42:26Z
html.description.abstract<p>Research suggests that there are many benefits of school gardens for students, teachers and community. Not only can they help children eat more fruits and vegetables and be more physically active, they can help to create learning opportunities and increase teacher satisfaction. In Worcester, Massachusetts, a city with high poverty and food insecurity rates, a broad community coalition formed to brainstorm novel implementation models to improve the use and sustainability of school gardens. The group decided to foster new collaborations among higher education, K-12 schools and community organizations. The innovative idea was that higher education could meet their need for real-world application of various curricula, such as education, business, urban agriculture, marketing, horticulture, sustainable development, and engineering, through the implementation of school gardens. The resulting conference called AGES (Academic Gardening to Enrich our Students) united school teachers, professors, administration and community partners. The sessions featured information on: 1) successful models of higher education-K12 school garden partnerships, 2) building school gardening into the curriculum (psychosocial skills, STEM, environmental sciences, project-based learning, nutrition, healthy lifestyles), 3) research evidence on the benefits of school gardens, 4) strategies for building community through gardening, and 5) garden planning and maintenance. US Representative Jim McGovern was the keynote speaker, highlighting the importance of this collaborative work.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathchr_symposium/2019/posters/11


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