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dc.contributor.authorAbu, Hawa Ozien
dc.contributor.authorMcManus, David D.
dc.contributor.authorKiefe, Catarina I.
dc.contributor.authorGoldberg, Robert J.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:08:05.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T15:41:51Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T15:41:51Z
dc.date.issued2019-03-22
dc.date.submitted2019-04-01
dc.identifier.doi10.13028/vb4f-cr19
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/26733
dc.description.abstractBackground: Optimum management after an Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS) requires considerable patient engagement/activation. Religious practices permeate people's lives and may influence engagement in their healthcare. Little is known about the relationship between religiosity and patient activation in hospital survivors of an ACS. Methods: We recruited patients hospitalized for an ACS at six medical centers in Central Massachusetts and Georgia (2011-2013). Participants self-reported three measures of religiosity - strength and comfort from religion, making petition prayers, and awareness of intercessory prayers for health. Patient activation was assessed using the 6-item Patient Activation Measure (PAM-6). We categorized participants as either having low (levels 1 and 2) or high (levels 3 and 4) activation in examining the association between religiosity and patient activation while adjusting for sociodemographic, psychosocial, and clinical variables. Results: Patients (n=2,067) were on average, 61 years old, 34% were women, and 81% were non-Hispanic White. Approximately 85% reported deriving strength and comfort from religion, two-thirds prayed for their health, and 89% received intercessions for their health. Overall, 57.5% had low activation. Reports of a great deal (aOR: 2.02; 95% CI: 1.44-2.84), and little/some (aOR: 1.45; 95% CI: 1.07-1.98) strength and comfort from religion were associated with high activation respectively, as was the receipt of intercessions (aOR: 1.48; 95% CI: 1.07-2.05). Praying for one's health was associated with low activation (aOR: 0.78; 95% CI: 0.61-0.99). Conclusion and Clinical Practice Implications: Patient activation was associated with religiosity, suggesting that healthcare providers may use this knowledge to enhance patient engagement in their care.
dc.formatflash_audio
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.rightsCopyright the Author(s)
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/
dc.subjectAcute Coronary Syndrome
dc.subjectACS
dc.subjectreligiosity
dc.subjectreligion
dc.subjectspirituality
dc.subjectpatient engagement
dc.subjectAlternative and Complementary Medicine
dc.subjectCardiovascular Diseases
dc.subjectCivic and Community Engagement
dc.subjectCommunity-Based Research
dc.subjectCommunity Health and Preventive Medicine
dc.subjectHealth Psychology
dc.subjectHealth Services Administration
dc.subjectPsychiatry and Psychology
dc.subjectReligion
dc.subjectTranslational Medical Research
dc.titleReligiosity and Patient Engagement in their Healthcare Among Hospital Survivors of an Acute Coronary Syndrome
dc.typePoster
dc.identifier.legacyfulltexthttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1155&context=chr_symposium&unstamped=1
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/chr_symposium/2019/posters/12
dc.identifier.contextkey14154480
refterms.dateFOA2022-08-24T03:42:45Z
html.description.abstract<p>Background: Optimum management after an Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS) requires considerable patient engagement/activation. Religious practices permeate people's lives and may influence engagement in their healthcare. Little is known about the relationship between religiosity and patient activation in hospital survivors of an ACS.</p> <p>Methods: We recruited patients hospitalized for an ACS at six medical centers in Central Massachusetts and Georgia (2011-2013). Participants self-reported three measures of religiosity - strength and comfort from religion, making petition prayers, and awareness of intercessory prayers for health. Patient activation was assessed using the 6-item Patient Activation Measure (PAM-6). We categorized participants as either having low (levels 1 and 2) or high (levels 3 and 4) activation in examining the association between religiosity and patient activation while adjusting for sociodemographic, psychosocial, and clinical variables.</p> <p>Results: Patients (n=2,067) were on average, 61 years old, 34% were women, and 81% were non-Hispanic White. Approximately 85% reported deriving strength and comfort from religion, two-thirds prayed for their health, and 89% received intercessions for their health. Overall, 57.5% had low activation. Reports of a great deal (aOR: 2.02; 95% CI: 1.44-2.84), and little/some (aOR: 1.45; 95% CI: 1.07-1.98) strength and comfort from religion were associated with high activation respectively, as was the receipt of intercessions (aOR: 1.48; 95% CI: 1.07-2.05). Praying for one's health was associated with low activation (aOR: 0.78; 95% CI: 0.61-0.99).</p> <p>Conclusion and Clinical Practice Implications: Patient activation was associated with religiosity, suggesting that healthcare providers may use this knowledge to enhance patient engagement in their care.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathchr_symposium/2019/posters/12


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