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dc.contributor.authorPagano-Therrien, Jesica
dc.contributor.authorChiriboga, German
dc.contributor.authorSimpson, Shauna M.
dc.contributor.authorCalista, Joanne L.
dc.contributor.authorMarien, Kendra
dc.date2022-08-11T08:08:05.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T15:41:54Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T15:41:54Z
dc.date.issued2019-03-22
dc.date.submitted2019-03-25
dc.identifier.doi10.13028/s8k3-pq15
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/26742
dc.description.abstractThe ethical principles of respect and justice oblige the use of culturally sensitive approaches when engaging participants in research, however cultural competence training is lacking for researchers who work with LGBTQ populations. The purpose of this study was to explore how researchers can create a welcoming research environment for LGBTQ research participants in the context of historical distrust of medical research as a barrier to research participation among minority populations. Grounded by a framework of communicative competence, this study explored elements of preferred communication during recruitment and informed consent for research involving LGBTQ participants. Grammatical, sociolinguistic, strategic and discourse competence domains aided exploration of the preferences held by participants in LGBTQ sub-groups, as well as the perceived barriers to research. Thirty-six participants, who self-identified as part of the LGBTQ community and were recruited through our community partner, the Center for Health Impact, took part in either focus groups or individual interviews. Preliminary analysis reveals community engagement and building trust are key, particularly in an academic medical center where a patient's clinical experiences may impact their willingness to become a research participant. Participants offered insight into each competence domain, covering: terminology to promote inclusivity, body language to avoid, reducing stigma by being up front and feedback on crafting a more LGBTQ-friendly basic demography questionnaire. These findings will aid in the refinement of an LGBTQ-focused version of our Simulation-based Community-engaged Research Intervention for Informed Consent Protocol Testing and Training (SCRIIPTT) to build communicative competence among clinical researchers.
dc.formatflash_audio
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.rightsCopyright the Author(s)
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/
dc.subjectcultural competence
dc.subjectcommunicative competence
dc.subjectresearch participants
dc.subjectLGBTQ
dc.subjectSimulation-based Community-engaged Research Intervention for Informed Consent Protocol Testing and Training (SCRIIPTT)
dc.subjectcommunity engagement
dc.subjectCivic and Community Engagement
dc.subjectCommunity-Based Research
dc.subjectCommunity Health and Preventive Medicine
dc.subjectGender, Race, Sexuality, and Ethnicity in Communication
dc.subjectHealth Communication
dc.subjectMedical Education
dc.subjectTranslational Medical Research
dc.titleCommunicative Competence for Researchers working with LGBTQ Communities
dc.typePoster
dc.identifier.legacyfulltexthttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1152&context=chr_symposium&unstamped=1
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/chr_symposium/2019/posters/7
dc.legacy.embargo2020-03-25T00:00:00-07:00
dc.identifier.contextkey14099928
refterms.dateFOA2022-08-24T03:52:40Z
html.description.abstract<p>The ethical principles of respect and justice oblige the use of culturally sensitive approaches when engaging participants in research, however cultural competence training is lacking for researchers who work with LGBTQ populations. The purpose of this study was to explore how researchers can create a welcoming research environment for LGBTQ research participants in the context of historical distrust of medical research as a barrier to research participation among minority populations. Grounded by a framework of communicative competence, this study explored elements of preferred communication during recruitment and informed consent for research involving LGBTQ participants. Grammatical, sociolinguistic, strategic and discourse competence domains aided exploration of the preferences held by participants in LGBTQ sub-groups, as well as the perceived barriers to research. Thirty-six participants, who self-identified as part of the LGBTQ community and were recruited through our community partner, the Center for Health Impact, took part in either focus groups or individual interviews. Preliminary analysis reveals community engagement and building trust are key, particularly in an academic medical center where a patient's clinical experiences may impact their willingness to become a research participant. Participants offered insight into each competence domain, covering: terminology to promote inclusivity, body language to avoid, reducing stigma by being up front and feedback on crafting a more LGBTQ-friendly basic demography questionnaire. These findings will aid in the refinement of an LGBTQ-focused version of our Simulation-based Community-engaged Research Intervention for Informed Consent Protocol Testing and Training (SCRIIPTT) to build communicative competence among clinical researchers.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathchr_symposium/2019/posters/7


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