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dc.contributor.authorDresner, Danielle
dc.contributor.authorGergen Barnett, Katherine
dc.contributor.authorResnick, Kirsten
dc.contributor.authorLaird, Lance D.
dc.contributor.authorGardiner, Paula
dc.date2022-08-11T08:08:06.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T15:42:23Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T15:42:23Z
dc.date.issued2016-06-01
dc.date.submitted2019-02-25
dc.identifier.citation<p>Pain Medicine, Volume 17, Issue 6, 1 June 2016, Pages 1183–1191. doi: 10.1093/pm/pnw030. [Epub ahead of print] <a href="https://doi.org/10.1093/pm/pnw030">Link to article on publisher's site</a></p>
dc.identifier.issn1526-2375 (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/pm/pnw030
dc.identifier.pmid27040666
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/26833
dc.description<p>At the time of publication, Paula Gardiner was not yet affiliated with the University of Massachusetts Medical School.</p>
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: Integrative Medicine Group Visits (IMGVs) are an 8-week outpatient medical group visit program for chronic pain patients combining mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR), integrative medicine, and patient education. The authors conducted a qualitative study with IMGV participants to better understand the effects of IMGVs on patients' health. DESIGN: This qualitative study enrolled a convenience sample of 19 participants from the parent prospective observational cohort study of IMGVs (n = 65). All participants in the parent study were invited to participate. SETTING: Boston Medical Center (BMC) is a private, not-for-profit, 496-bed, academic medical center and the largest safety net hospital in New England. SUBJECTS: Individuals in this study had a diagnosis of chronic pain and/or one or more chronic conditions (e.g., diabetes, depression, or metabolic syndrome), had attended > /=1 group visit, and their 8-week session had ended before completing the interview. METHODS: The authors conducted individual semi-structured interviews. Interviews were audio-taped, transcribed, and analyzed. RESULTS: Participants cite gains from IMGVs including improved self-monitoring, self-regulation, and increased mindfulness. The group setting leads patients to feel "not alone" in their health conditions, gain a sense of perspective on their health, and share coping strategies in a supportive network. These improvements in physical and mental health improved clinical outcomes for participants including reductions in pain. CONCLUSIONS: Group visits and integrative medicine both offer some potential solutions in the treatment of chronic pain. Models such as IMGVs can help individuals living with chronic conditions, addressing their emotional and physical health needs.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<p><a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=27040666&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a></p>
dc.relation.urlhttps://doi.org/10.1093/pm/pnw030
dc.subjectChronic Pain
dc.subjectGroup Medical Visit
dc.subjectIntegrative Medicine
dc.subjectMindfulness-Based Stress Reduction
dc.subjectQualitative Methods
dc.subjectAlternative and Complementary Medicine
dc.subjectBehavioral Medicine
dc.subjectHealth Psychology
dc.subjectIntegrative Medicine
dc.subjectMovement and Mind-Body Therapies
dc.subjectPain Management
dc.subjectPsychiatry and Psychology
dc.titleListening to Their Words: A Qualitative Analysis of Integrative Medicine Group Visits in an Urban Underserved Medical Setting
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitlePain medicine (Malden, Mass.)
dc.source.volume17
dc.source.issue6
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/cipc/74
dc.identifier.contextkey13889809
html.description.abstract<p>OBJECTIVE: Integrative Medicine Group Visits (IMGVs) are an 8-week outpatient medical group visit program for chronic pain patients combining mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR), integrative medicine, and patient education. The authors conducted a qualitative study with IMGV participants to better understand the effects of IMGVs on patients' health.</p> <p>DESIGN: This qualitative study enrolled a convenience sample of 19 participants from the parent prospective observational cohort study of IMGVs (n = 65). All participants in the parent study were invited to participate.</p> <p>SETTING: Boston Medical Center (BMC) is a private, not-for-profit, 496-bed, academic medical center and the largest safety net hospital in New England.</p> <p>SUBJECTS: Individuals in this study had a diagnosis of chronic pain and/or one or more chronic conditions (e.g., diabetes, depression, or metabolic syndrome), had attended > /=1 group visit, and their 8-week session had ended before completing the interview.</p> <p>METHODS: The authors conducted individual semi-structured interviews. Interviews were audio-taped, transcribed, and analyzed.</p> <p>RESULTS: Participants cite gains from IMGVs including improved self-monitoring, self-regulation, and increased mindfulness. The group setting leads patients to feel "not alone" in their health conditions, gain a sense of perspective on their health, and share coping strategies in a supportive network. These improvements in physical and mental health improved clinical outcomes for participants including reductions in pain.</p> <p>CONCLUSIONS: Group visits and integrative medicine both offer some potential solutions in the treatment of chronic pain. Models such as IMGVs can help individuals living with chronic conditions, addressing their emotional and physical health needs.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathcipc/74
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Family Medicine and Community Health
dc.contributor.departmentCenter for Integrated Primary Care
dc.source.pages1183–1191


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