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dc.contributor.authorWatts, Nelson B.
dc.contributor.authorGLOW Investigators
dc.date2022-08-11T08:08:08.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T15:43:43Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T15:43:43Z
dc.date.issued2014-07-01
dc.date.submitted2015-06-02
dc.identifier.citationWatts NB; GLOW investigators. Insights from the Global Longitudinal Study of Osteoporosis in Women (GLOW). Nat Rev Endocrinol. 2014 Jul;10(7):412-22. doi:10.1038/nrendo.2014.55. Epub 2014 Apr 22. Review. PubMed PMID: 24751880. <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nrendo.2014.55">Link to article on publisher's website</a>
dc.identifier.issn1759-5037
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/nrendo.2014.55
dc.identifier.pmid24751880
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/27159
dc.description.abstractGLOW is an observational, longitudinal, practice-based cohort study of osteoporosis in 60,393 women aged ≥ 55 years in 10 countries on three continents. In this Review, we present insights from the first 3 years of the study. Despite cost analyses being frequently based on spine and hip fractures, we found that nonvertebral, nonhip fractures were around five times more common and doubled the use of health-care resources compared with hip and spine fractures combined. Fractures not at the four so-called major sites in FRAX(®) (upper arm, forearm, hip and clinical vertebral fractures) account for > 40% of all fractures. The risk of fracture is increased by various comorbidities, such as Parkinson disease, multiple sclerosis and lung and heart disease. Obesity, although thought to be protective against all fractures, substantially increased the risk of fractures in the ankle or lower leg. Simple assessment by age plus fracture history has good predictive value for all fractures, but risk profiles differ for first and subsequent fractures. Fractures diminish quality of life as much or more than diabetes mellitus, arthritis and lung disease, yet women substantially underestimate their own fracture risk. Treatment rates in patients at high risk of fracture are below those recommended but might be too frequent in women at low risk. Comorbidities and the limits of current therapeutic regimens jeopardize the efficacy of drugs; new regimens should be explored for severe cases.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=24751880&dopt=Abstract">Link to article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nrendo.2014.55
dc.subjectAccidental Falls
dc.subjectAged
dc.subjectAged, 80 and over
dc.subjectComorbidity
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectHip Fractures
dc.subjectHospitalization
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectLongitudinal Studies
dc.subjectMiddle Aged
dc.subjectObesity
dc.subjectOsteoporosis
dc.subjectOsteoporosis, Postmenopausal
dc.subjectOsteoporotic Fractures
dc.subjectPrevalence
dc.subjectQuality of Life
dc.subjectRisk
dc.subjectRisk Factors
dc.subjectSpinal Fractures
dc.subjectEndocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism
dc.subjectEpidemiology
dc.subjectHealth Services Research
dc.subjectMusculoskeletal Diseases
dc.subjectWomen's Health
dc.titleInsights from the Global Longitudinal Study of Osteoporosis in Women (GLOW)
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleNature Reviews. Endocrinology
dc.source.volume10
dc.source.issue7
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/cor_glow/25
dc.identifier.contextkey7164867
html.description.abstract<p>GLOW is an observational, longitudinal, practice-based cohort study of osteoporosis in 60,393 women aged ≥ 55 years in 10 countries on three continents. In this Review, we present insights from the first 3 years of the study. Despite cost analyses being frequently based on spine and hip fractures, we found that nonvertebral, nonhip fractures were around five times more common and doubled the use of health-care resources compared with hip and spine fractures combined. Fractures not at the four so-called major sites in FRAX(®) (upper arm, forearm, hip and clinical vertebral fractures) account for > 40% of all fractures. The risk of fracture is increased by various comorbidities, such as Parkinson disease, multiple sclerosis and lung and heart disease. Obesity, although thought to be protective against all fractures, substantially increased the risk of fractures in the ankle or lower leg. Simple assessment by age plus fracture history has good predictive value for all fractures, but risk profiles differ for first and subsequent fractures. Fractures diminish quality of life as much or more than diabetes mellitus, arthritis and lung disease, yet women substantially underestimate their own fracture risk. Treatment rates in patients at high risk of fracture are below those recommended but might be too frequent in women at low risk. Comorbidities and the limits of current therapeutic regimens jeopardize the efficacy of drugs; new regimens should be explored for severe cases.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathcor_glow/25
dc.contributor.departmentCenter for Outcomes Research
dc.source.pages412-22


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