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dc.contributor.authorKalluri, Nikita
dc.contributor.authorKelly, Colleen
dc.contributor.authorGarg, Arvin
dc.date2022-08-11T08:08:10.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T15:44:49Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T15:44:49Z
dc.date.issued2021-03-01
dc.date.submitted2021-03-25
dc.identifier.citation<p>Kalluri N, Kelly C, Garg A. Child Care During the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Bad Situation Made Worse. Pediatrics. 2021 Mar;147(3):e2020041525. doi: 10.1542/peds.2020-041525. Epub 2020 Dec 11. PMID: 33310906. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2020-041525">Link to article on publisher's site</a></p>
dc.identifier.issn0031-4005 (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.1542/peds.2020-041525
dc.identifier.pmid33310906
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/27398
dc.description.abstractPediatricians have long recognized that social determinants (the circumstances in which children live, learn, and play) influence the health and well-being of children and their families. The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has highlighted the importance of this broader scope of health care, which encompasses more than simply addressing a child’s medical conditions. Although the vast majority of COVID-19 cases in children have been mild, the secondary effects on the health of children have been profound. Downstream effects of the virus on a family’s social circumstances, including increased food insecurity, housing instability, school closures, and lack of child care, have exacerbated preexisting socioeconomic and racial disparities. Although it has often been overlooked, the need for safe and enriching child care that allows parents to be able to work, particularly for the most vulnerable children in our society, has become more acute over the last several months and requires urgent action.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<p><a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=33310906&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a></p>
dc.relation.urlhttps://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2020-041525
dc.subjectCOVID-19 pandemic
dc.subjectsocial determinants of health
dc.subjectchildren
dc.subjectchild care
dc.subjecthealth disparities
dc.subjectHealth Services Administration
dc.subjectInfectious Disease
dc.subjectMaternal and Child Health
dc.subjectMedicine and Health
dc.subjectPediatrics
dc.subjectVirus Diseases
dc.titleChild Care During the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Bad Situation Made Worse
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitlePediatrics
dc.source.volume147
dc.source.issue3
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/covid19/195
dc.identifier.contextkey22169540
html.description.abstract<p>Pediatricians have long recognized that social determinants (the circumstances in which children live, learn, and play) influence the health and well-being of children and their families. The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has highlighted the importance of this broader scope of health care, which encompasses more than simply addressing a child’s medical conditions. Although the vast majority of COVID-19 cases in children have been mild, the secondary effects on the health of children have been profound. Downstream effects of the virus on a family’s social circumstances, including increased food insecurity, housing instability, school closures, and lack of child care, have exacerbated preexisting socioeconomic and racial disparities. Although it has often been overlooked, the need for safe and enriching child care that allows parents to be able to work, particularly for the most vulnerable children in our society, has become more acute over the last several months and requires urgent action.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathcovid19/195
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Pediatrics
dc.source.pagese2020041525


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