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dc.contributor.authorEl Ghaziri, Mazen
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Susan
dc.contributor.authorPurpora, Christina
dc.contributor.authorSimons, Shellie
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, Rosemary A.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:08:11.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T15:45:18Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T15:45:18Z
dc.date.issued2021-07-28
dc.date.submitted2021-08-27
dc.identifier.citation<p>El Ghaziri M, Johnson S, Purpora C, Simons S, Taylor R. Registered Nurses' Experiences With Incivility During the Early Phase of COVID-19 Pandemic: Results of a Multi-State Survey. Workplace Health Saf. 2022 Mar;70(3):148-160. doi: 10.1177/21650799211024867. Epub 2021 Jul 28. PMID: 34318719; PMCID: PMC8322958. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1177/21650799211024867">Link to article on publisher's site</a></p>
dc.identifier.issn2165-0799 (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/21650799211024867
dc.identifier.pmid34318719
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/27496
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Incivility among workers in the health sector is recognized as an occupational hazard. The COVID-19 outbreak brought sudden and profound changes to many health care settings, many of which have been identified as antecedents to workplace incivility. The purpose of this retrospective study was to explore the experiences of registered nurses with workplace incivility, cyber-incivility, and incivility outside of work during the early phase of the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: This mixed-methods study used convenience sampling. Data were collected from June to September 2020 via an online survey, which consisted of both closed- and open-ended questions. Participants were recruited from national nursing organizations and unions. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and thematic analysis for open-ended responses. FINDINGS: A total of 526 nurses' responses were included in the analysis. More than one third experienced greater incivility at work during the COVID-19 outbreak than before the pandemic (37.4%), and almost half (45.7%) said they witnessed more incivility than before the pandemic. Cyber-incivility and incivility outside of work were also issues. Qualitative results indicated that respondents felt they were on edge during this period. Other themes included leadership failure, fractured co-worker relationships, heightened incivility from patients and families, and hostility and ostracism from the general public. CONCLUSION/APPLICATION TO PRACTICE: Occupational health nurses, nursing leaders, and staff nurses need to work to restore relations that were fractured by incivility during the pandemic. In the future, improved preparedness, including establishing clear channels of communication, may lessen incivility by decreasing role stress and organizational chaos.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<p><a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=34318719&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a></p>
dc.rightsCopyright © 2021 The Author(s). This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits any use, reproduction and distribution of the work without further permission provided the original work is attributed as specified on the SAGE and Open Access pages (https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/open-access-at-sage).
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectCOVID-19
dc.subjectcyber-incivility
dc.subjectincivility
dc.subjectoccupational stressors
dc.subjectregistered nurses
dc.subjectInfectious Disease
dc.subjectNursing
dc.subjectOccupational Health and Industrial Hygiene
dc.subjectVirus Diseases
dc.titleRegistered Nurses' Experiences With Incivility During the Early Phase of COVID-19 Pandemic: Results of a Multi-State Survey
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleWorkplace health and safety
dc.source.volume70
dc.source.issue3
dc.identifier.legacyfulltexthttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1303&amp;context=covid19&amp;unstamped=1
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/covid19/298
dc.identifier.contextkey24527841
refterms.dateFOA2022-08-23T15:45:18Z
html.description.abstract<p>BACKGROUND: Incivility among workers in the health sector is recognized as an occupational hazard. The COVID-19 outbreak brought sudden and profound changes to many health care settings, many of which have been identified as antecedents to workplace incivility. The purpose of this retrospective study was to explore the experiences of registered nurses with workplace incivility, cyber-incivility, and incivility outside of work during the early phase of the COVID-19 pandemic.</p> <p>METHODS: This mixed-methods study used convenience sampling. Data were collected from June to September 2020 via an online survey, which consisted of both closed- and open-ended questions. Participants were recruited from national nursing organizations and unions. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and thematic analysis for open-ended responses.</p> <p>FINDINGS: A total of 526 nurses' responses were included in the analysis. More than one third experienced greater incivility at work during the COVID-19 outbreak than before the pandemic (37.4%), and almost half (45.7%) said they witnessed more incivility than before the pandemic. Cyber-incivility and incivility outside of work were also issues. Qualitative results indicated that respondents felt they were on edge during this period. Other themes included leadership failure, fractured co-worker relationships, heightened incivility from patients and families, and hostility and ostracism from the general public.</p> <p>CONCLUSION/APPLICATION TO PRACTICE: Occupational health nurses, nursing leaders, and staff nurses need to work to restore relations that were fractured by incivility during the pandemic. In the future, improved preparedness, including establishing clear channels of communication, may lessen incivility by decreasing role stress and organizational chaos.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathcovid19/298
dc.contributor.departmentGraduate School of Nursing
dc.source.pages148-160


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Copyright © 2021 The Author(s). This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits any use, reproduction and distribution of the work without further permission provided the original work is attributed as specified on the SAGE and Open Access pages (https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/open-access-at-sage).
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Copyright © 2021 The Author(s). This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits any use, reproduction and distribution of the work without further permission provided the original work is attributed as specified on the SAGE and Open Access pages (https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/open-access-at-sage).