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dc.contributor.authorWangu, Zoon
dc.contributor.authorSwartz, Hannah
dc.contributor.authorDoherty, Meaghan
dc.date2022-08-11T08:08:12.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T15:45:58Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T15:45:58Z
dc.date.issued2022-03-30
dc.date.submitted2022-05-23
dc.identifier.citation<p>Wangu Z, Swartz H, Doherty M. Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) possibly secondary to COVID-19 mRNA vaccination. BMJ Case Rep. 2022 Mar 30;15(3):e247176. doi: 10.1136/bcr-2021-247176. PMID: 35354564; PMCID: PMC8968554. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1136/bcr-2021-247176">Link to article on publisher's site</a></p>
dc.identifier.issn1757-790X (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/bcr-2021-247176
dc.identifier.pmid35354564
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/27653
dc.description.abstractMultisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) associated with COVID-19 is a postinfectious condition identified during the COVID-19 pandemic with specific Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and WHO criteria. Theoretical concerns have been raised whether MIS-C might also occur after COVID-19 vaccination, as the pathogenesis of MIS-C is not yet entirely understood. We present a woman in her late teens who developed MIS-C after having received two doses of Pfizer BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine 12 weeks prior, in the setting of documented anti-spike SARS-CoV-2 IgG positive, antinucleocapsid SARS-CoV-2 IgG negative, and multiple negative surveillance SARS-CoV-2 PCRs done in the 12-week period prior to development of MIS-C. While vaccination remains safe and critical in controlling the pandemic, it may be considered as a potential trigger for MIS-C in patients with no history of infection. Further surveillance is necessary to determine whether MIS-C will emerge as a confirmed adverse event after COVID-19 vaccination.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<p><a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=35354564&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a></p>
dc.rightsCopyright © BMJ Publishing Group Limited 2022. Re-use permitted under CC BY-NC. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ. This is an open access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
dc.subjectCOVID-19
dc.subjectPediatrics
dc.subjectVaccination
dc.subjectImmunization
dc.subjectImmunology and Infectious Disease
dc.subjectInfectious Disease
dc.subjectPathological Conditions, Signs and Symptoms
dc.subjectPediatrics
dc.subjectTherapeutics
dc.subjectVirus Diseases
dc.titleMultisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) possibly secondary to COVID-19 mRNA vaccination
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitleBMJ case reports
dc.source.volume15
dc.source.issue3
dc.identifier.legacyfulltexthttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1398&amp;context=covid19&amp;unstamped=1
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/covid19/390
dc.identifier.contextkey29327229
refterms.dateFOA2022-08-23T15:45:58Z
html.description.abstract<p>Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) associated with COVID-19 is a postinfectious condition identified during the COVID-19 pandemic with specific Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and WHO criteria. Theoretical concerns have been raised whether MIS-C might also occur after COVID-19 vaccination, as the pathogenesis of MIS-C is not yet entirely understood. We present a woman in her late teens who developed MIS-C after having received two doses of Pfizer BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine 12 weeks prior, in the setting of documented anti-spike SARS-CoV-2 IgG positive, antinucleocapsid SARS-CoV-2 IgG negative, and multiple negative surveillance SARS-CoV-2 PCRs done in the 12-week period prior to development of MIS-C. While vaccination remains safe and critical in controlling the pandemic, it may be considered as a potential trigger for MIS-C in patients with no history of infection. Further surveillance is necessary to determine whether MIS-C will emerge as a confirmed adverse event after COVID-19 vaccination.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathcovid19/390
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Medicine
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Cardiology
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases and Immunology
dc.source.pagese247176


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Copyright © BMJ Publishing Group Limited 2022. Re-use permitted under CC BY-NC. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ. This is an open access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Copyright © BMJ Publishing Group Limited 2022. Re-use permitted under CC BY-NC. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ. This is an open access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.