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dc.contributor.authorPriefer, Ronny
dc.contributor.authorRust, Michael
dc.date2022-08-11T08:08:14.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T15:47:10Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T15:47:10Z
dc.date.issued2014-05-20
dc.date.submitted2014-10-10
dc.identifier.doi10.13028/rn7b-0h58
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/27919
dc.description<p>Abstract of poster presented at the 2014 UMass Center for Clinical and Translational Science Research Retreat, held on May 20, 2014 at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Mass.</p>
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Diabetes can be a life-long disease which requires continuous blood-glucose monitoring. Currently technology, albeit good, does have its draw-backs; in particular that it is an invasive technique which causes discomfort to the individual. Therefore, low compliance can ultimately lead to other health issues. Approaches are underway to develop a portable, hand-held, noninvasive monitoring device to detect the biomarker, acetone, found in the breath of diabetics. By creating films of poly(4-vinylbenzeneboronic acid) and poly(allylamine hydrochloride), acetone can react with these via a Petasis reaction. This alters the physicochemical nature of the film, providing a quantification of acetone, and thus hopefully blood-glucose levels, in a non-invasive manner. Methods: UV-transmitting poly(methyl methacrylate) slides are coated with a system of PAH/PVBBA at differing pH values and are then exposed to acetone/water vapor. Concentrations of acetone evaluated are 0.1–10 ppm. The slides are next subjected to the light emitted by a diode with a peak wavelength of 300 ± 5 nm. The transmitted light is detected by a UV-photosensor with an integrated transimpedance amplifier that produces a voltage output as a function of absorption. Results: We have successfully synthesized poly(4-vinylbenzeneboronic acid) and multilayered with poly(allylamine hydrochloride). We have been able to cross-link these two polymers using only acetone vapor and are developing a hand-held device. Analyzing the difference in output voltage from exposed to unexposed slides at varying acetone concentrations, provides is a linear relationship up to 2500 ppb, which is above the high point for breath acetone concentration. Conclusions: We have been able to develop a technology that accurately detects acetone vapor. We are engineering a hand-held breathalyzer device to detect acetone in the breath of diabetic individuals and are attempting to optimize its capabilities.
dc.formatyoutube
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.rightsCopyright the Author(s)
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/
dc.subjectBiomedical Devices and Instrumentation
dc.subjectDiagnosis
dc.subjectEquipment and Supplies
dc.subjectNutritional and Metabolic Diseases
dc.subjectTranslational Medical Research
dc.titlePoint-of-Care Diabetes Monitoring via Breath Acetone Detection
dc.typePoster Abstract
dc.identifier.legacyfulltexthttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1348&amp;context=cts_retreat&amp;unstamped=1
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/cts_retreat/2014/posters/128
dc.identifier.contextkey6226571
refterms.dateFOA2022-08-23T15:47:10Z
html.description.abstract<p>Purpose: Diabetes can be a life-long disease which requires continuous blood-glucose monitoring. Currently technology, albeit good, does have its draw-backs; in particular that it is an invasive technique which causes discomfort to the individual. Therefore, low compliance can ultimately lead to other health issues. Approaches are underway to develop a portable, hand-held, noninvasive monitoring device to detect the biomarker, acetone, found in the breath of diabetics. By creating films of poly(4-vinylbenzeneboronic acid) and poly(allylamine hydrochloride), acetone can react with these via a Petasis reaction. This alters the physicochemical nature of the film, providing a quantification of acetone, and thus hopefully blood-glucose levels, in a non-invasive manner.</p> <p>Methods: UV-transmitting poly(methyl methacrylate) slides are coated with a system of PAH/PVBBA at differing pH values and are then exposed to acetone/water vapor. Concentrations of acetone evaluated are 0.1–10 ppm. The slides are next subjected to the light emitted by a diode with a peak wavelength of 300 ± 5 nm. The transmitted light is detected by a UV-photosensor with an integrated transimpedance amplifier that produces a voltage output as a function of absorption.</p> <p>Results: We have successfully synthesized poly(4-vinylbenzeneboronic acid) and multilayered with poly(allylamine hydrochloride). We have been able to cross-link these two polymers using only acetone vapor and are developing a hand-held device. Analyzing the difference in output voltage from exposed to unexposed slides at varying acetone concentrations, provides is a linear relationship up to 2500 ppb, which is above the high point for breath acetone concentration.</p> <p>Conclusions: We have been able to develop a technology that accurately detects acetone vapor. We are engineering a hand-held breathalyzer device to detect acetone in the breath of diabetic individuals and are attempting to optimize its capabilities.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathcts_retreat/2014/posters/128


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