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dc.contributor.authorLapane, Kate L.
dc.contributor.authorYang, Shibing
dc.contributor.authorDriban, Jeffrey B.
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Shao-Hsien
dc.contributor.authorDube, Catherine E
dc.contributor.authorMcAlindon, Timothy E.
dc.contributor.authorEaton, Charles B.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:08:14.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T15:47:27Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T15:47:27Z
dc.date.issued2014-05-20
dc.date.submitted2014-10-10
dc.identifier.doi10.13028/pmp9-vk55
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/27990
dc.description<p>Abstract of poster presented at the 2014 UMass Center for Clinical and Translational Science Research Retreat, held on May 20, 2014 at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Mass.</p>
dc.description.abstractObjective: To estimate the extent to which long-term use of prescription non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAIDs) relieve symptoms and delay disease progression among patients with radiographically confirmed osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. Methods: Using Osteoarthritis Initiative data, we identified participants with confirmed OA at enrollment and evaluated changes in symptoms measured using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index, WOMAC (n=1,846) and joint space width measured using serial x-rays and a customized software tool (n=1,116) over 4 years. Covariates included sociodemographics, OA clinical characteristics, indices of general health status, body mass index, and use of other treatments. We adjusted for baseline and time-varying confounders using marginal structural modeling. Results: Six percent initiated NSAID treatment at year one, with half of the initiators being regular users. After adjusting for time-varying confounders with marginal structural models, we found that compared to participants who never reported use of prescription NSAIDs, those reporting use for 3 years had on average 0.88 point decrease (95% Confidence Interval (CI): -0.46 to 2.22) in WOMAC Pain, 0.72 point decrease (95% CI: -0.12 to 1.56) in WOMAC Stiffness, 4.27 points decrease (95% CI: 0.31 to -8.84) in WOMAC Function, and 0.28mm increase (95% CI: -0.06 to 0.62) in joint space width. Conclusions: Long term NSAID use was associated with a priori defined minimally important clinical improvements in stiffness, function and structural degeneration, but not in pain.
dc.formatyoutube
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.rightsCopyright the Author(s)
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/
dc.subjectChemical Actions and Uses
dc.subjectClinical Epidemiology
dc.subjectMusculoskeletal Diseases
dc.subjectRheumatology
dc.subjectTranslational Medical Research
dc.titleLong-term Effects of Use of Prescription Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Agents on Symptoms and Disease Progression among Patients with Radiographically Confirmed Osteoarthritis of the Knee
dc.typePoster Abstract
dc.identifier.legacyfulltexthttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1294&amp;context=cts_retreat&amp;unstamped=1
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/cts_retreat/2014/posters/74
dc.identifier.contextkey6225223
refterms.dateFOA2022-08-23T15:47:27Z
html.description.abstract<p>Objective: To estimate the extent to which long-term use of prescription non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAIDs) relieve symptoms and delay disease progression among patients with radiographically confirmed osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee.</p> <p>Methods: Using Osteoarthritis Initiative data, we identified participants with confirmed OA at enrollment and evaluated changes in symptoms measured using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index, WOMAC (n=1,846) and joint space width measured using serial x-rays and a customized software tool (n=1,116) over 4 years. Covariates included sociodemographics, OA clinical characteristics, indices of general health status, body mass index, and use of other treatments. We adjusted for baseline and time-varying confounders using marginal structural modeling.</p> <p>Results: Six percent initiated NSAID treatment at year one, with half of the initiators being regular users. After adjusting for time-varying confounders with marginal structural models, we found that compared to participants who never reported use of prescription NSAIDs, those reporting use for 3 years had on average 0.88 point decrease (95% Confidence Interval (CI): -0.46 to 2.22) in WOMAC Pain, 0.72 point decrease (95% CI: -0.12 to 1.56) in WOMAC Stiffness, 4.27 points decrease (95% CI: 0.31 to -8.84) in WOMAC Function, and 0.28mm increase (95% CI: -0.06 to 0.62) in joint space width.</p> <p>Conclusions: Long term NSAID use was associated with a priori defined minimally important clinical improvements in stiffness, function and structural degeneration, but not in pain.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathcts_retreat/2014/posters/74


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