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dc.contributor.authorHargraves, J. Lee
dc.contributor.authorBonollo, Debra
dc.contributor.authorFerguson, Warren J.
dc.contributor.authorOrvek, Elizabeth Aaker
dc.date2022-08-11T08:08:16.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T15:48:18Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T15:48:18Z
dc.date.issued2017-05-16
dc.date.submitted2017-06-25
dc.identifier.doi10.13028/kyks-1d05
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/28183
dc.description.abstractBackground: Uncontrolled hypertension is a significant public health problem in the U.S. with about one half of people able to keep blood pressure under control. Furthermore, the social and economic costs of poor hypertension control are staggering. Community Health Worker (CHW) interventions are a low-cost, culturally tailored approach to improve chronic disease outcomes. Methods: This randomized trial conducted at two Community Health Centers (CHCs) in Massachusetts assessed the effect of CHWs assisting patients with hypertension. CHWs, trained in motivational interviewing, used video narratives from patients who have worked to control their BP through diet, exercise, and better medication adherence. Participants enrolled in the study were randomly assigned to immediate intervention or a delayed intervention (DI) (4 to 6 months later). Each participant received a DVD and met with a CHW 5 times (twice in person and three times telephonically) over six months. Results: One hundred seventy-one patients were randomly assigned to one of two treatment conditions. Participants ranged in age from 25 to 79 years old (mean = 56 years old). Seventy-three percent of participants were Hispanic and reported speaking Spanish at home. The intervention group experienced a significant reduction in BP over the 6 month period of time they were receiving the intervention. At 6 months, the average systolic BP declined from 141 at baseline to 136 (p Discussion: Having culturally appropriate tools, such as narrative videos and CHWs trained in motivational interviewing, can be an important, cost effective aid to educate, support, and encourage people to manage hypertension.
dc.formatflash_audio
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.rightsCopyright the Author(s)
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/
dc.subjecthypertension
dc.subjectpublic health
dc.subjectMassachusetts
dc.subjectcommunity health workers
dc.subjectCardiovascular Diseases
dc.subjectCommunity Health and Preventive Medicine
dc.subjectHealth Services Administration
dc.subjectTranslational Medical Research
dc.titleA Randomized Controlled Trial of Community Health Workers Using Patient Stories to Support Hypertension Management: Preliminary Results
dc.typePoster Abstract
dc.identifier.legacyfulltexthttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1507&context=cts_retreat&unstamped=1
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/cts_retreat/2017/posters/32
dc.identifier.contextkey10348794
refterms.dateFOA2022-08-23T15:48:18Z
html.description.abstract<p><strong>B</strong><strong>ackground:</strong> Uncontrolled hypertension is a significant public health problem in the U.S. with about one half of people able to keep blood pressure under control. Furthermore, the social and economic costs of poor hypertension control are staggering. Community Health Worker (CHW) interventions are a low-cost, culturally tailored approach to improve chronic disease outcomes.</p> <p><strong>Methods:</strong> This randomized trial conducted at two Community Health Centers (CHCs) in Massachusetts assessed the effect of CHWs assisting patients with hypertension. CHWs, trained in motivational interviewing, used video narratives from patients who have worked to control their BP through diet, exercise, and better medication adherence. Participants enrolled in the study were randomly assigned to immediate intervention or a delayed intervention (DI) (4 to 6 months later). Each participant received a DVD and met with a CHW 5 times (twice in person and three times telephonically) over six months.</p> <p><strong>Results: </strong>One hundred seventy-one patients were randomly assigned to one of two treatment conditions. Participants ranged in age from 25 to 79 years old (mean = 56 years old). Seventy-three percent of participants were Hispanic and reported speaking Spanish at home. The intervention group experienced a significant reduction in BP over the 6 month period of time they were receiving the intervention. At 6 months, the average systolic BP declined from 141 at baseline to 136 (p</p> <p><strong>Discussion:</strong> Having culturally appropriate tools, such as narrative videos and CHWs trained in motivational interviewing, can be an important, cost effective aid to educate, support, and encourage people to manage hypertension.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathcts_retreat/2017/posters/32


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