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dc.contributor.authorThind, Herpreet
dc.contributor.authorScott-Sheldon, Lori
dc.contributor.authorLantini, Ryan
dc.contributor.authorBalletto, Brittany
dc.contributor.authorDonahue, Marissa
dc.contributor.authorFeulner, Melissa
dc.contributor.authorSalmoirago-Blotcher, Elena
dc.contributor.authorBrock, Beth C.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:08:16.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T15:48:33Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T15:48:33Z
dc.date.issued2017-05-16
dc.date.submitted2017-07-02
dc.identifier.doi10.13028/gh6j-bp54
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/28236
dc.description.abstractObjective: The purpose of this meta-analysis was to examine the effects of yoga for glycemic control among adults with type II diabetes (T2DM). Methods: Comprehensive electronic databases searches located 2,559 unique studies with relevant key terms. Studies were included if they a) evaluated a yoga intervention to promote T2DM management, b) used an objective measure to assess glycemic control at post-intervention, and c) had follow-up length or post-test of at least 8 weeks from baseline. Studies were excluded if yoga was not the primary intervention focus (e.g., if yoga was part of a mindfulness-based intervention). Independent raters coded participant, design and methodological characteristics and intervention content. Weighted mean effect sizes and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. Results: Total 23 studies with 2,473 participants (M age = 53 years; 43% women) met eligibility criteria. Most studies (18) were conducted in India; 2 were conducted in England, 1 in Cuba, 1 in Indonesia, and 1 in Iran. Compared with controls, yoga participants were successful in improving their HbA1c (d+ = 0.37, 95% CI = 0.18, 0.55; k = 14), fasting blood glucose (d+ = 0.57, 95% CI = 0.38, 0.76; k = 19), postprandial blood glucose (d+ = 0.29, 95% CI = 0.17, 0.41; k = 11). Yoga was also associated with significant improvements in lipid profile, blood pressure, body mass index and waist/hip ratio. Overall, studies satisfied an average of 41% of the methodological quality (MQ) criteria; however, MQ score was not associated with any outcome (ps >.05). Conclusion: Yoga improved glycemic outcomes and other risk factors for complications in adults with T2DM relative to a control condition. Additional studies with longer follow-ups are needed to determine the long-term efficacy of yoga for adults with T2DM.
dc.formatflash_audio
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.rightsCopyright the Author(s)
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/
dc.subjectdiabetes
dc.subjectyoga
dc.subjectAlternative and Complementary Medicine
dc.subjectNutritional and Metabolic Diseases
dc.subjectTranslational Medical Research
dc.titleThe Effects of Yoga on Adults with Type II Diabetes: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis
dc.typePoster Abstract
dc.identifier.legacyfulltexthttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1575&context=cts_retreat&unstamped=1
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/cts_retreat/2017/posters/80
dc.identifier.contextkey10386473
refterms.dateFOA2022-08-23T15:48:34Z
html.description.abstract<p><strong>Objective</strong>: The purpose of this meta-analysis was to examine the effects of yoga for glycemic control among adults with type II diabetes (T2DM).</p> <p><strong>Methods:</strong> Comprehensive electronic databases searches located 2,559 unique studies with relevant key terms. Studies were included if they a) evaluated a yoga intervention to promote T2DM management, b) used an objective measure to assess glycemic control at post-intervention, and c) had follow-up length or post-test of at least 8 weeks from baseline. Studies were excluded if yoga was not the primary intervention focus (e.g., if yoga was part of a mindfulness-based intervention). Independent raters coded participant, design and methodological characteristics and intervention content. Weighted mean effect sizes and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated.</p> <p><strong>Results:</strong> Total 23 studies with 2,473 participants (<em>M</em> age = 53 years; 43% women) met eligibility criteria. Most studies (18) were conducted in India; 2 were conducted in England, 1 in Cuba, 1 in Indonesia, and 1 in Iran. Compared with controls, yoga participants were successful in improving their HbA1c (d+ = 0.37, 95% CI = 0.18, 0.55; k = 14), fasting blood glucose (d+ = 0.57, 95% CI = 0.38, 0.76; k = 19), postprandial blood glucose (d+ = 0.29, 95% CI = 0.17, 0.41; k = 11). Yoga was also associated with significant improvements in lipid profile, blood pressure, body mass index and waist/hip ratio. Overall, studies satisfied an average of 41% of the methodological quality (MQ) criteria; however, MQ score was not associated with any outcome (<em>p</em>s >.05).</p> <p><strong>Conclusion: </strong>Yoga improved glycemic outcomes and other risk factors for complications in adults with T2DM relative to a control condition. Additional studies with longer follow-ups are needed to determine the long-term efficacy of yoga for adults with T2DM.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathcts_retreat/2017/posters/80


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