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dc.contributor.authorBroach, John
dc.contributor.authorHart, Alexander
dc.contributor.authorGriswold, Matthew
dc.contributor.authorLai, Jeffrey T.
dc.contributor.authorBoyer, Edward W.
dc.contributor.authorSkolnik, Aaron B.
dc.contributor.authorChai, Peter R.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:08:17.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T15:49:33Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T15:49:33Z
dc.date.issued2018-01-03
dc.date.submitted2018-03-26
dc.identifier.citation<p>Proc Annu Hawaii Int Conf Syst Sci. 2018 Jan 3;2018:1416-1422. http://hdl.handle.net/10125/50062</p>
dc.identifier.issn1530-1605 (Linking)
dc.identifier.pmid29398976
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/28462
dc.description.abstractWearable smart glasses like Google Glass provide real-time video and image transmission to remote viewers. The use of Google Glass and other Augmented Reality (AR) platforms in mass casualty incidents (MCIs) can provide incident commanders and physicians at receiving hospitals real-time data regarding injuries sustained by victims at the scene. This real-time data is critical to allocation of hospital resources prior to receiving victims of a MCI. Remote physician participation in real-time MCI care prior to victims' hospital arrival may improve triage, and direct emergency and critical care services to those most in need. We report the use of Google Glass among first responders to transmit real-time data from a simulated MCI to allow remote physicians to complete augmented secondary triage.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<p><a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=29398976&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a></p>
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.subjectGoogle Glass
dc.subjectaugmented reality
dc.subjectmass casualty incidents
dc.subjectdisasters
dc.subjectdisaster medicine
dc.subjectfirst responders
dc.subjecttriage
dc.subjectremote physician participation
dc.subjectaugmented reality
dc.subjectSmart glasses
dc.subjecttelemedicine
dc.subjectBiomedical Devices and Instrumentation
dc.subjectEmergency Medicine
dc.subjectEquipment and Supplies
dc.subjectHealth Services Administration
dc.subjectTelemedicine
dc.titleUsability and Reliability of Smart Glasses for Secondary Triage During Mass Casualty Incidents
dc.typeConference Paper
dc.source.volume2018
dc.identifier.legacyfulltexthttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1155&amp;context=emed_pp&amp;unstamped=1
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/emed_pp/150
dc.identifier.contextkey11845508
refterms.dateFOA2022-08-23T15:49:33Z
html.description.abstract<p>Wearable smart glasses like Google Glass provide real-time video and image transmission to remote viewers. The use of Google Glass and other Augmented Reality (AR) platforms in mass casualty incidents (MCIs) can provide incident commanders and physicians at receiving hospitals real-time data regarding injuries sustained by victims at the scene. This real-time data is critical to allocation of hospital resources prior to receiving victims of a MCI. Remote physician participation in real-time MCI care prior to victims' hospital arrival may improve triage, and direct emergency and critical care services to those most in need. We report the use of Google Glass among first responders to transmit real-time data from a simulated MCI to allow remote physicians to complete augmented secondary triage.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathemed_pp/150
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Emergency Medicine
dc.source.pages1416-1422


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