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dc.contributor.authorBaumann, Brigitte M.
dc.contributor.authorMazzarelli, Anthony
dc.contributor.authorBrunner, Jaclyn
dc.contributor.authorChansky, Michael E.
dc.contributor.authorThompson, Nicole
dc.contributor.authorBoudreaux, Edwin D.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:08:17.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T15:49:46Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T15:49:46Z
dc.date.issued2010-08-31
dc.date.submitted2011-06-28
dc.identifier.citationJ Emerg Med. 2010 Aug 26. <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jemermed.2010.06.006">Link to article on publisher's site</a>
dc.identifier.issn0736-4679 (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jemermed.2010.06.006
dc.identifier.pmid20800411
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/28514
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Many consider heroin abuse a problem of the inner city, but suburban patients may also be at risk. OBJECTIVE: To characterize the demographics and purchase/use patterns of heroin users in an inner-city emergency department (ED). METHODS: The study was conducted in one of the most impoverished and crime-ridden cities in the United States. Demographics and substance use habits of ED patients were prospectively collected. Patients who were<18 years of>age, cognitively impaired, or did not speak English were excluded. Participants were further categorized as homeless, inner-city, and suburban residents. RESULTS: Of 3947 participants, 608 (15%) used an illicit substance in the past year, with marijuana (9%) and cocaine (6%) the most commonly used. Heroin ranked third, used by 180 (5%) participants, with 61% male, 31% black, and 20% Hispanic. There were 64 homeless, 60 suburban, and 56 inner-city heroin users. The most common route of use was injection (68%), with the highest rate in the homeless (84%). The majority of homeless and inner-city users bought (73%, both groups) and used (homeless 74%, inner city 88%) in the inner city. Of suburban users, 58% purchased and 61% used heroin in the inner city. Prescription narcotic use was more common in homeless (20%) and suburban (23%) heroin users than in inner-city users (9%) (p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Heroin is the third most commonly used illicit substance by ED patients, and a significant amount of inner-city purchase and use activity is conducted by suburban heroin users.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=20800411&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jemermed.2010.06.006
dc.subjectHeroin
dc.subjectHeroin Dependence
dc.subjectDrug Users
dc.subjectEmergency Service, Hospital
dc.subjectEmergency Medicine
dc.titlePurchase and Use Patterns of Heroin Users at an Inner-city Emergency Department
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleThe Journal of emergency medicine
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/emed_pp/3
dc.identifier.contextkey2078658
html.description.abstract<p>BACKGROUND: Many consider heroin abuse a problem of the inner city, but suburban patients may also be at risk.</p> <p>OBJECTIVE: To characterize the demographics and purchase/use patterns of heroin users in an inner-city emergency department (ED).</p> <p>METHODS: The study was conducted in one of the most impoverished and crime-ridden cities in the United States. Demographics and substance use habits of ED patients were prospectively collected. Patients who were<18 years of>age, cognitively impaired, or did not speak English were excluded. Participants were further categorized as homeless, inner-city, and suburban residents.</p> <p>RESULTS: Of 3947 participants, 608 (15%) used an illicit substance in the past year, with marijuana (9%) and cocaine (6%) the most commonly used. Heroin ranked third, used by 180 (5%) participants, with 61% male, 31% black, and 20% Hispanic. There were 64 homeless, 60 suburban, and 56 inner-city heroin users. The most common route of use was injection (68%), with the highest rate in the homeless (84%). The majority of homeless and inner-city users bought (73%, both groups) and used (homeless 74%, inner city 88%) in the inner city. Of suburban users, 58% purchased and 61% used heroin in the inner city. Prescription narcotic use was more common in homeless (20%) and suburban (23%) heroin users than in inner-city users (9%) (p<0.001).</p> <p>CONCLUSIONS: Heroin is the third most commonly used illicit substance by ED patients, and a significant amount of inner-city purchase and use activity is conducted by suburban heroin users.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathemed_pp/3
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Emergency Medicine


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