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dc.contributor.authorGleason, Kelly T.
dc.contributor.authorTanner, Elizabeth K.
dc.contributor.authorBoyd, Cynthia M.
dc.contributor.authorSaczynski, Jane S.
dc.contributor.authorSzanton, Sarah L.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:08:19.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T15:50:59Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T15:50:59Z
dc.date.issued2016-08-01
dc.date.submitted2016-09-02
dc.identifier.citationPatient Educ Couns. 2016 Aug;99(8):1421-6. doi: 10.1016/j.pec.2016.03.011. Epub 2016 Mar 17. <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pec.2016.03.011">Link to article on publisher's site</a>
dc.identifier.issn0738-3991 (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.pec.2016.03.011
dc.identifier.pmid27019992
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/28788
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: Patient activation, the patient's knowledge, skill, and confidence to manage his or her health, is an important indicator of future health and use of health care resources. Understanding factors associated with patient activation in an older population with functional difficulties may inform care in this population. This study aimed to determine whether patient activation is associated with depression, chronic conditions, family support, difficulties with activities of daily living (ADLs) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs), hospitalizations, education, and financial strain. METHODS: (N=277), We administered surveys measuring patient activation, financial strain, depressive symptoms, family support, and chronic conditions to an older adult population. We tested association through multivariate linear regressions controlling for race, sex, and age. RESULTS: Patient activation is significantly (p < 0.05), positively associated with family support and self-rated overall health, and significantly (p < 0.05), negatively associated with depressive symptoms and difficulties with ADLs and IADLs. We found no association between patient activation and financial stress, hospitalizations, and education. CONCLUSIONS: Older age, depressive symptoms, and difficulties with ADLs and IADLs were associated with decreased patient activation. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Developing interventions tailored to older adults' level of patient activation has the potential to improve outcomes for this population.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=27019992&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pec.2016.03.011
dc.subjectActivities of daily living
dc.subjectFunctional difficulties
dc.subjectInstrumental
dc.subjectOlder adults
dc.subjectPatient activation
dc.subjectPatient activation measure
dc.subjectGeriatrics
dc.subjectHealth Services Administration
dc.titleFactors associated with patient activation in an older adult population with functional difficulties
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitlePatient education and counseling
dc.source.volume99
dc.source.issue8
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/faculty_pubs/1027
dc.identifier.contextkey9072013
html.description.abstract<p>OBJECTIVE: Patient activation, the patient's knowledge, skill, and confidence to manage his or her health, is an important indicator of future health and use of health care resources. Understanding factors associated with patient activation in an older population with functional difficulties may inform care in this population. This study aimed to determine whether patient activation is associated with depression, chronic conditions, family support, difficulties with activities of daily living (ADLs) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs), hospitalizations, education, and financial strain.</p> <p>METHODS: (N=277), We administered surveys measuring patient activation, financial strain, depressive symptoms, family support, and chronic conditions to an older adult population. We tested association through multivariate linear regressions controlling for race, sex, and age.</p> <p>RESULTS: Patient activation is significantly (p < 0.05), positively associated with family support and self-rated overall health, and significantly (p < 0.05), negatively associated with depressive symptoms and difficulties with ADLs and IADLs. We found no association between patient activation and financial stress, hospitalizations, and education.</p> <p>CONCLUSIONS: Older age, depressive symptoms, and difficulties with ADLs and IADLs were associated with decreased patient activation.</p> <p>PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Developing interventions tailored to older adults' level of patient activation has the potential to improve outcomes for this population.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathfaculty_pubs/1027
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medicine, Division of Geriatric Medicine
dc.source.pages1421-6


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