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dc.contributor.authorGranberry, Phillip
dc.contributor.authorTorres, Maria Idali
dc.contributor.authorAllison, Jeroan J.
dc.contributor.authorRosal, Milagros C
dc.contributor.authorRustan, Sarah
dc.contributor.authorColon, Melissa
dc.contributor.authorFontes, Mayara
dc.contributor.authorCruz, Ivettte
dc.date2022-08-11T08:08:20.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T15:51:35Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T15:51:35Z
dc.date.issued2016-03-01
dc.date.submitted2017-03-07
dc.identifier.citationJ Racial Ethn Health Disparities. 2016 Mar;3(1):138-44. doi: 10.1007/s40615-015-0123-x. Epub 2015 May 8. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1007/s40615-015-0123-x">Link to article on publisher's site</a>
dc.identifier.issn2196-8837 (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s40615-015-0123-x
dc.identifier.pmid26896113
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/28937
dc.description.abstractEngaging community residents and undergraduate Latino students in developing research and community literacies can expose both groups to resources needed to address health disparities. The bidirectional learning process described in this article developed these literacies through an ethnographic mapping fieldwork activity that used a learning-by-doing method in combination with reflection on the research experience. The active efforts of research team members to promote reflection on the research activities were integral for developing research and community literacies. Our findings suggest that, through participating in this field research activity, undergraduate students and community residents developed a better understanding of resources for addressing health disparities. Our research approach assisted community residents and undergraduate students by demystifying research, translating scientific and community knowledge, providing exposure to multiple literacies, and generating increased awareness of research as a tool for change among community residents and their organizations. The commitment of the community and university leadership to this pedagogical method can bring out the full potential of mentoring, both to contribute to the development of the next generation of Latino researchers and to assist community members in their efforts to address health disparities.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=26896113&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4764136/
dc.subjectBidirectional learning
dc.subjectCBPR
dc.subjectCommunity–university partnerships
dc.subjectLearning-by-doing
dc.subjectMentoring
dc.subjectCommunity-Based Learning
dc.subjectCommunity-Based Research
dc.subjectCommunity Health and Preventive Medicine
dc.subjectHealth Services Administration
dc.subjectHealth Services Research
dc.titleDeveloping Research and Community Literacies to Recruit Latino Researchers and Practitioners to Address Health Disparities
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleJournal of racial and ethnic health disparities
dc.source.volume3
dc.source.issue1
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/faculty_pubs/1165
dc.identifier.contextkey9801480
html.description.abstract<p>Engaging community residents and undergraduate Latino students in developing research and community literacies can expose both groups to resources needed to address health disparities. The bidirectional learning process described in this article developed these literacies through an ethnographic mapping fieldwork activity that used a learning-by-doing method in combination with reflection on the research experience. The active efforts of research team members to promote reflection on the research activities were integral for developing research and community literacies. Our findings suggest that, through participating in this field research activity, undergraduate students and community residents developed a better understanding of resources for addressing health disparities. Our research approach assisted community residents and undergraduate students by demystifying research, translating scientific and community knowledge, providing exposure to multiple literacies, and generating increased awareness of research as a tool for change among community residents and their organizations. The commitment of the community and university leadership to this pedagogical method can bring out the full potential of mentoring, both to contribute to the development of the next generation of Latino researchers and to assist community members in their efforts to address health disparities.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathfaculty_pubs/1165
dc.contributor.departmentPrevention Research Center
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Quantitative Health Sciences
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medicine, Division of Preventive and Behavioral Medicine
dc.source.pages138-44


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