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dc.contributor.authorNguyen, Hoa L
dc.contributor.authorYarzebski, Jorge L.
dc.contributor.authorLessard, Darleen M.
dc.contributor.authorGore, Joel M.
dc.contributor.authorMcManus, David D.
dc.contributor.authorGoldberg, Robert J.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:08:22.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T15:52:37Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T15:52:37Z
dc.date.issued2017-06-07
dc.date.submitted2017-12-06
dc.identifier.citationJ Am Heart Assoc. 2017 Jun 7;6(6). pii: e005566. doi: 10.1161/JAHA.117.005566. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1161/JAHA.117.005566">Link to article on publisher's site</a>
dc.identifier.issn2047-9980 (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.1161/JAHA.117.005566
dc.identifier.pmid28592462
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/29178
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Cardiogenic shock (CS) is a serious complication of acute myocardial infarction, and the time of onset of CS has a potential role in influencing its prognosis. Limited contemporary data exist on this complication, however, especially from a population-based perspective. Our study objectives were to describe decade-long trends in the incidence, in-hospital mortality, and factors associated with the development of CS in 3 temporal contexts: (1) before hospital arrival for acute myocardial infarction (prehospital CS); (2) within 24 hours of hospitalization (early CS); and (3) > /=24 hours after hospitalization (late CS). METHODS AND RESULTS: The study population consisted of 5782 patients with an acute myocardial infarction who were admitted to all 11 hospitals in central Massachusetts on a biennial basis between 2001 and 2011. The overall proportion of patients who developed CS was 5.2%. The proportion of patients with prehospital CS (1.6%) and late CS (1.5%) remained stable over time, whereas the proportion of patients with early CS declined from 2.2% in 2001-2003 to 1.2% in 2009-2011. In-hospital mortality for prehospital CS increased from 38.9% in 2001-2003 to 53.6% in 2009-2011, whereas in-hospital mortality for early and late CS decreased over time (35.9% and 64.7% in 2001-2003 to 15.8% and 39.1% in 2009-2011, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Development of prehospital and in-hospital CS was associated with poor short-term survival and the in-hospital death rates among those with prehospital CS increased over time. Interventions focused on preventing or treating prehospital and late CS are needed to improve in-hospital survival after acute myocardial infarction.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<p><a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=28592462&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a></p>
dc.rights© 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited and is not used for commercial purposes.
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
dc.subjectacute myocardial infarction
dc.subjectcardiogenic shock timing
dc.subjecthospital prognosis
dc.subjectpopulation‐based study
dc.subjectCardiology
dc.subjectCardiovascular Diseases
dc.subjectClinical Epidemiology
dc.subjectEpidemiology
dc.titleTen-Year (2001-2011) Trends in the Incidence Rates and Short-Term Outcomes of Early Versus Late Onset Cardiogenic Shock After Hospitalization for Acute Myocardial Infarction
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleJournal of the American Heart Association
dc.source.volume6
dc.source.issue6
dc.identifier.legacyfulltexthttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=2406&amp;context=faculty_pubs&amp;unstamped=1
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/faculty_pubs/1403
dc.identifier.contextkey11207535
refterms.dateFOA2022-08-23T15:52:37Z
html.description.abstract<p>BACKGROUND: Cardiogenic shock (CS) is a serious complication of acute myocardial infarction, and the time of onset of CS has a potential role in influencing its prognosis. Limited contemporary data exist on this complication, however, especially from a population-based perspective. Our study objectives were to describe decade-long trends in the incidence, in-hospital mortality, and factors associated with the development of CS in 3 temporal contexts: (1) before hospital arrival for acute myocardial infarction (prehospital CS); (2) within 24 hours of hospitalization (early CS); and (3) > /=24 hours after hospitalization (late CS).</p> <p>METHODS AND RESULTS: The study population consisted of 5782 patients with an acute myocardial infarction who were admitted to all 11 hospitals in central Massachusetts on a biennial basis between 2001 and 2011. The overall proportion of patients who developed CS was 5.2%. The proportion of patients with prehospital CS (1.6%) and late CS (1.5%) remained stable over time, whereas the proportion of patients with early CS declined from 2.2% in 2001-2003 to 1.2% in 2009-2011. In-hospital mortality for prehospital CS increased from 38.9% in 2001-2003 to 53.6% in 2009-2011, whereas in-hospital mortality for early and late CS decreased over time (35.9% and 64.7% in 2001-2003 to 15.8% and 39.1% in 2009-2011, respectively).</p> <p>CONCLUSIONS: Development of prehospital and in-hospital CS was associated with poor short-term survival and the in-hospital death rates among those with prehospital CS increased over time. Interventions focused on preventing or treating prehospital and late CS are needed to improve in-hospital survival after acute myocardial infarction.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathfaculty_pubs/1403
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medicine
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Quantitative Health Sciences
dc.source.pagese005566


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© 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited and is not used for commercial purposes.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited and is not used for commercial purposes.