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dc.contributor.authorMa, Yuqian
dc.contributor.authorBao, Jin
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Yuanwei
dc.contributor.authorLi, Zhan Jun
dc.contributor.authorZhou, Xiangyu
dc.contributor.authorWan, Changlin
dc.contributor.authorHuang, Ling
dc.contributor.authorZhao, Yang
dc.contributor.authorHan, Gang
dc.contributor.authorXue, Tian
dc.date2022-08-11T08:08:24.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T15:53:48Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T15:53:48Z
dc.date.issued2019-04-04
dc.date.submitted2020-01-23
dc.identifier.citation<p>Ma Y, Bao J, Zhang Y, Li Z, Zhou X, Wan C, Huang L, Zhao Y, Han G, Xue T. Mammalian Near-Infrared Image Vision through Injectable and Self-Powered Retinal Nanoantennae. <em>Cell</em>. 2019 Apr 4;177(2):243-255.e15. doi: 10.1016/j.cell.2019.01.038. Epub 2019 Feb 28. PMID: 30827682.</p>
dc.identifier.issn1097-4172
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.cell.2019.01.038
dc.identifier.pmid30827682
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/29426
dc.description.abstractMammals cannot see light over 700 nm in wavelength. This limitation is due to the physical thermodynamic properties of the photon-detecting opsins. However, the detection of naturally invisible near-infrared (NIR) light is a desirable ability. To break this limitation, we developed ocular injectable photoreceptor-binding upconversion nanoparticles (pbUCNPs). These nanoparticles anchored on retinal photoreceptors as miniature NIR light transducers to create NIR light image vision with negligible side effects. Based on single-photoreceptor recordings, electroretinograms, cortical recordings, and visual behavioral tests, we demonstrated that mice with these nanoantennae could not only perceive NIR light, but also see NIR light patterns. Excitingly, the injected mice were also able to differentiate sophisticated NIR shape patterns. Moreover, the NIR light pattern vision was ambient-daylight compatible and existed in parallel with native daylight vision. This new method will provide unmatched opportunities for a wide variety of emerging bio-integrated nanodevice designs and applications. VIDEO ABSTRACT.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherCell Press
dc.relation<p><a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30827682/" target="_blank" title="Link to article in PubMed">Link to article in PubMed</a></p>
dc.relation.urlhttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.cell.2019.01.038
dc.subjectbiocompatibility
dc.subjectimage vision
dc.subjectnanoantenna
dc.subjectnear-infrared light
dc.subjectphotoreceptors
dc.subjectretina
dc.subjectspectrum
dc.subjectupconversion nanoparticle
dc.subjectvisual behavior
dc.subjectvisual enhancement
dc.subjectNanomedicine
dc.subjectNeuroscience and Neurobiology
dc.subjectVision Science
dc.titleMammalian Near-Infrared Image Vision through Injectable and Self-Powered Retinal Nanoantennae
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleCell
dc.source.volume177
dc.source.issue2
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/faculty_pubs/1653
dc.identifier.contextkey16315071
html.description.abstract<p>Mammals cannot see light over 700 nm in wavelength. This limitation is due to the physical thermodynamic properties of the photon-detecting opsins. However, the detection of naturally invisible near-infrared (NIR) light is a desirable ability. To break this limitation, we developed ocular injectable photoreceptor-binding upconversion nanoparticles (pbUCNPs). These nanoparticles anchored on retinal photoreceptors as miniature NIR light transducers to create NIR light image vision with negligible side effects. Based on single-photoreceptor recordings, electroretinograms, cortical recordings, and visual behavioral tests, we demonstrated that mice with these nanoantennae could not only perceive NIR light, but also see NIR light patterns. Excitingly, the injected mice were also able to differentiate sophisticated NIR shape patterns. Moreover, the NIR light pattern vision was ambient-daylight compatible and existed in parallel with native daylight vision. This new method will provide unmatched opportunities for a wide variety of emerging bio-integrated nanodevice designs and applications. VIDEO ABSTRACT.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathfaculty_pubs/1653
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology
dc.source.pages243-255.e15


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