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dc.contributor.authorCuffee, Yendelela L.
dc.contributor.authorRosal, Milagros C
dc.contributor.authorHargraves, J. Lee
dc.contributor.authorBriesacher, Becky A.
dc.contributor.authorAkuley, Suzanne
dc.contributor.authorAltwatban, Noof
dc.contributor.authorHullett, Sandral
dc.contributor.authorAllison, Jeroan J.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:08:25.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T15:54:32Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T15:54:32Z
dc.date.issued2020-07-09
dc.date.submitted2020-09-17
dc.identifier.citation<p>Cuffee YL, Rosal M, Hargraves JL, Briesacher BA, Akuley S, Altwatban N, Hullett S, Allison JJ. Does Home Remedy Use Contribute to Medication Nonadherence Among Blacks with Hypertension? Ethn Dis. 2020 Jul 9;30(3):451-458. doi: 10.18865/ed.30.3.451. PMID: 32742150; PMCID: PMC7360183. <a href="https://doi.org/10.18865/ed.30.3.451">Link to article on publisher's site</a></p>
dc.identifier.issn1049-510X (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.18865/ed.30.3.451
dc.identifier.pmid32742150
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/29573
dc.description.abstractBackground: Home remedies (HRs) are described as foods, herbs, and other household products used to manage chronic conditions. The objective of this study was to examine home remedy (HR) use among Blacks with hypertension and to determine if home remedy use is correlated with blood pressure and medication adherence. Methods: Data for this cross-sectional study were obtained from the TRUST study conducted between 2006-2008. Medication adherence was measured using the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale, and HR use was self-reported. Multivariable associations were quantified using ordinal logistic regression. Results: The study sample consisted of 788 Blacks with hypertension living in the southern region of the United States. HR use was associated with higher systolic (HR users 152.79, nonusers 149.53; P=.004) and diastolic blood pressure (HR users 84.10, nonusers 82.14 P=.005). Use of two or more HRs was associated with low adherence (OR: .55, CI: .36-.83, P= .004). Conclusion: The use of HR and the number of HRs used may be associated with medication nonadherence, and higher systolic and diastolic blood pressure among Blacks with hypertension. Medication nonadherence is of critical importance for individuals with hypertension, and it is essential that health care providers be aware of health behaviors that may serve as barriers to medication adherence, such as use of home remedies.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<p><a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=32742150&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a></p>
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7360183/
dc.subjectBlacks
dc.subjectHigh Blood Pressure Medication Adherence
dc.subjectHome Remedies
dc.subjectHypertension
dc.subjectUMCCTS funding
dc.subjectAlternative and Complementary Medicine
dc.subjectBehavior and Behavior Mechanisms
dc.subjectCardiovascular Diseases
dc.subjectRace and Ethnicity
dc.subjectTherapeutics
dc.titleDoes Home Remedy Use Contribute to Medication Nonadherence Among Blacks with Hypertension
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleEthnicity and disease
dc.source.volume30
dc.source.issue3
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/faculty_pubs/1793
dc.identifier.contextkey19432916
html.description.abstract<p>Background: Home remedies (HRs) are described as foods, herbs, and other household products used to manage chronic conditions. The objective of this study was to examine home remedy (HR) use among Blacks with hypertension and to determine if home remedy use is correlated with blood pressure and medication adherence.</p> <p>Methods: Data for this cross-sectional study were obtained from the TRUST study conducted between 2006-2008. Medication adherence was measured using the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale, and HR use was self-reported. Multivariable associations were quantified using ordinal logistic regression.</p> <p>Results: The study sample consisted of 788 Blacks with hypertension living in the southern region of the United States. HR use was associated with higher systolic (HR users 152.79, nonusers 149.53; P=.004) and diastolic blood pressure (HR users 84.10, nonusers 82.14 P=.005). Use of two or more HRs was associated with low adherence (OR: .55, CI: .36-.83, P= .004).</p> <p>Conclusion: The use of HR and the number of HRs used may be associated with medication nonadherence, and higher systolic and diastolic blood pressure among Blacks with hypertension. Medication nonadherence is of critical importance for individuals with hypertension, and it is essential that health care providers be aware of health behaviors that may serve as barriers to medication adherence, such as use of home remedies.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathfaculty_pubs/1793
dc.contributor.departmentPrevention Research Center
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Family Medicine and Community Health
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Population and Quantitative Health Sciences
dc.source.pages451-458


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