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dc.contributor.authorCong, Qian
dc.contributor.authorBrem, Ethan A.
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Jing
dc.contributor.authorAlfoldi, Jessica
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Jeremy
dc.contributor.authorKarlsson, Elinor K
dc.contributor.authorLindblad-Toh, Kerstin
dc.contributor.authorMalaney, Jason L.
dc.contributor.authorIsraelsen, William J.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:08:25.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T15:54:49Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T15:54:49Z
dc.date.issued2020-11-03
dc.date.submitted2020-12-07
dc.identifier.citation<p>bioRxiv 2020.11.02.365791; doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2020.11.02.365791. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1101/2020.11.02.365791" target="_blank" title="preprint in bioRxiv"> Link to preprint on bioRxiv</a></p>
dc.identifier.doi10.1101/2020.11.02.365791
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/29626
dc.description<p>This article is a preprint. Preprints are preliminary reports of work that have not been certified by peer review.</p>
dc.description.abstractHibernating mammals exhibit medically relevant phenotypes, but the genetic basis of hibernation remains poorly understood. Using the meadow jumping mouse (Zapus hudsonius), we investigated the genetic underpinnings of hibernation by uniting experimental and comparative genomic approaches. We assembled a Z. hudsonius genome and identified widespread expression changes during hibernation in genes important for circadian rhythm, membrane fluidity, and cell cycle arrest. Tissue-specific gene expression changes during torpor encompassed Wnt signaling in the brain and structural and transport functions in the kidney brush border. Using genomes from the closely related Zapus oregonus (previously classified as Z. princeps) and leveraging a panel of hibernating and non-hibernating rodents, we found selective pressure on genes involved in feeding behavior, metabolism, and cell biological processes potentially important for function at low body temperature. Leptin stands out with elevated conservation in hibernating rodents, implying a role for this metabolic hormone in triggering fattening and hibernation. These findings illustrate that mammalian hibernation requires adaptation at all levels of organismal form and function and lay the groundwork for future study of hibernation phenotypes.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.rightsThe copyright holder for this preprint is the author/funder, who has granted bioRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 International license.
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.subjectGenomics
dc.subjecthibernation
dc.subjectmeadow jumping mouse
dc.subjectphenotypes
dc.subjectBiochemical Phenomena, Metabolism, and Nutrition
dc.subjectBioinformatics
dc.subjectGenomics
dc.subjectPhysiological Processes
dc.subjectZoology
dc.titleThe meadow jumping mouse genome and transcriptome suggest mechanisms of hibernation [preprint]
dc.typePreprint
dc.source.journaltitlebioRxiv
dc.identifier.legacyfulltexthttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=2866&amp;context=faculty_pubs&amp;unstamped=1
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/faculty_pubs/1843
dc.identifier.contextkey20465939
refterms.dateFOA2022-08-23T15:54:49Z
html.description.abstract<p><p id="x-x-x-x-p-3">Hibernating mammals exhibit medically relevant phenotypes, but the genetic basis of hibernation remains poorly understood. Using the meadow jumping mouse (<em>Zapus hudsonius</em>), we investigated the genetic underpinnings of hibernation by uniting experimental and comparative genomic approaches. We assembled a <em>Z. hudsonius</em> genome and identified widespread expression changes during hibernation in genes important for circadian rhythm, membrane fluidity, and cell cycle arrest. Tissue-specific gene expression changes during torpor encompassed Wnt signaling in the brain and structural and transport functions in the kidney brush border. Using genomes from the closely related <em>Zapus oregonus</em> (previously classified as <em>Z. princeps</em>) and leveraging a panel of hibernating and non-hibernating rodents, we found selective pressure on genes involved in feeding behavior, metabolism, and cell biological processes potentially important for function at low body temperature. Leptin stands out with elevated conservation in hibernating rodents, implying a role for this metabolic hormone in triggering fattening and hibernation. These findings illustrate that mammalian hibernation requires adaptation at all levels of organismal form and function and lay the groundwork for future study of hibernation phenotypes.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathfaculty_pubs/1843
dc.contributor.departmentProgram in Bioinformatics and Integrative Biology


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The copyright holder for this preprint is the author/funder, who has granted bioRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 International license.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as The copyright holder for this preprint is the author/funder, who has granted bioRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 International license.