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dc.contributor.authorFeleke, Sindew M.
dc.contributor.authorHathaway, Nicholas J
dc.contributor.authorCunningham, Jane
dc.contributor.authorParr, Jonathan B.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:08:26.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T15:55:14Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T15:55:14Z
dc.date.issued2021-01-29
dc.date.submitted2021-03-15
dc.identifier.citation<p>medRxiv 2021.01.26.21250503; doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2021.01.26.21250503. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1101/2021.01.26.21250503" target="_blank" title="view preprint on medRxiv">Link to preprint on medRxiv</a></p>
dc.identifier.doi10.1101/2021.01.26.21250503
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/29709
dc.description<p>This article is a preprint. Preprints are preliminary reports of work that have not been certified by peer review.</p> <p>Full author list omitted for brevity. For the full list of authors, see article.</p>
dc.description.abstractMalaria diagnostic testing in Africa is threatened by Plasmodium falciparum parasites lacking histidine-rich protein 2 (pfhrp2) and 3 (pfhrp3) genes. Among 12,572 subjects enrolled along Ethiopia’s borders with Eritrea, Sudan, and South Sudan and using multiple assays, we estimate HRP2-based rapid diagnostic tests would miss 9.7% (95% CI 8.5-11.1) of falciparum malaria cases due to pfhrp2 deletion. Established and novel genomic tools reveal distinct subtelomeric deletion patterns, well-established pfhrp3 deletions, and recent expansion of pfhrp2 deletion. Current diagnostic strategies need to be urgently reconsidered in Ethiopia, and expanded surveillance is needed throughout the Horn of Africa.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relationNow published in Nature Microbiology doi: 10.1038/s41564-021-00962-4
dc.rightsThe copyright holder for this preprint is the author/funder, who has granted medRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 International license.
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.subjectInfectious Diseases
dc.subjecthrp2
dc.subjecthrp3
dc.subjectmalaria
dc.subjectmolecular inversion probe
dc.subjectgenomics
dc.subjectdeletion
dc.subjectevolution
dc.subjectEthiopia
dc.subjectAmino Acids, Peptides, and Proteins
dc.subjectDiagnosis
dc.subjectGenetics and Genomics
dc.subjectHealth Services Administration
dc.subjectImmunology and Infectious Disease
dc.subjectInfectious Disease
dc.subjectInternational Public Health
dc.subjectParasitic Diseases
dc.subjectParasitology
dc.subjectPopulation Biology
dc.titleEmergence and evolution of Plasmodium falciparum histidine-rich protein 2 and 3 deletion mutant parasites in Ethiopia [preprint]
dc.typePreprint
dc.source.journaltitlemedRxiv
dc.identifier.legacyfulltexthttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=2941&amp;context=faculty_pubs&amp;unstamped=1
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/faculty_pubs/1922
dc.identifier.contextkey22062275
refterms.dateFOA2022-08-23T15:55:14Z
html.description.abstract<p>Malaria diagnostic testing in Africa is threatened by <em>Plasmodium falciparum</em> parasites lacking histidine-rich protein 2 (<em>pfhrp2</em>) and 3 (<em>pfhrp3</em>) genes. Among 12,572 subjects enrolled along Ethiopia’s borders with Eritrea, Sudan, and South Sudan and using multiple assays, we estimate HRP2-based rapid diagnostic tests would miss 9.7% (95% CI 8.5-11.1) of falciparum malaria cases due to <em>pfhrp2</em> deletion. Established and novel genomic tools reveal distinct subtelomeric deletion patterns, well-established <em>pfhrp3</em> deletions, and recent expansion of <em>pfhrp2</em> deletion. Current diagnostic strategies need to be urgently reconsidered in Ethiopia, and expanded surveillance is needed throughout the Horn of Africa.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathfaculty_pubs/1922
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medicine


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The copyright holder for this preprint is the author/funder, who has granted medRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 International license.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as The copyright holder for this preprint is the author/funder, who has granted medRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 International license.