Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorHodge, Steven M
dc.contributor.authorHaselgrove, Christian
dc.contributor.authorHonor, Leah B.
dc.contributor.authorKennedy, David N.
dc.contributor.authorFrazier, Jean A.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:08:29.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T15:56:32Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T15:56:32Z
dc.date.issued2021-03-04
dc.date.submitted2022-04-14
dc.identifier.citation<p>Hodge SM, Haselgrove C, Honor L <em>et al.</em> An assessment of the autism neuroimaging literature for the prospects of re-executability [version 2; peer review: 2 approved]. <em>F1000Research</em> 2021, 9:1031. doi: 10.12688/f1000research.25306.2. PMID: 33796274; PMCID: PMC7968525. <a href="https://doi.org/10.12688/f1000research.25306.2" target="_blank" title="view article on publisher's site">View article on publisher's site</a></p>
dc.identifier.issn2046-1402
dc.identifier.doi10.12688/f1000research.25306.2
dc.identifier.pmid33796274
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/29988
dc.description<p>The PDF available for download is Version 2 of this research article.</p>
dc.description.abstractBackground: The degree of reproducibility of the neuroimaging literature in psychiatric application areas has been called into question and the issues that relate to this reproducibility are extremely complex. Some of these complexities have to do with the underlying biology of the disorders that we study and others arise due to the technology we apply to the analysis of the data we collect. Ultimately, the observations we make get communicated to the rest of the community through publications in the scientific literature. Methods: We sought to perform a ‘re-executability survey’ to evaluate the recent neuroimaging literature with an eye toward seeing if the technical aspects of our publication practices are helping or hindering the overall quest for a more reproducible understanding of brain development and aging. The topic areas examined include availability of the data, the precision of the imaging method description and the reporting of the statistical analytic approach, and the availability of the complete results. We applied the survey to 50 publications in the autism neuroimaging literature that were published between September 16, 2017 to October 1, 2018. Results: The results of the survey indicate that for the literature examined, data that is not already part of a public repository is rarely available, software tools are usually named but versions and operating system are not, it is expected that reasonably skilled analysts could approximately perform the analyses described, and the complete results of the studies are rarely available. Conclusions: We have identified that there is ample room for improvement in research publication practices. We hope exposing these issues in the retrospective literature can provide guidance and motivation for improving this aspect of our reporting practices in the future.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<p><a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33796274/" target="_blank" title="view article in PubMed">View article in PubMed</a></p>
dc.rightsCopyright: © 2021 Hodge SM et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectAutistic Disorder
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectNeuroimaging
dc.subjectReproducibility of Results
dc.subjectRetrospective Studies
dc.subjectSoftware
dc.subjectAutistic Disorder
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectNeuroimaging
dc.subjectReproducibility of Results
dc.subjectRetrospective Studies
dc.subjectSoftware
dc.subjectData Science
dc.subjectNeuroscience and Neurobiology
dc.subjectPsychiatry
dc.subjectPsychiatry and Psychology
dc.subjectScholarly Communication
dc.subjectScholarly Publishing
dc.titleAn assessment of the autism neuroimaging literature for the prospects of re-executability
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleF1000Research
dc.source.volume9
dc.identifier.legacyfulltexthttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=3224&amp;context=faculty_pubs&amp;unstamped=1
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/faculty_pubs/2191
dc.identifier.contextkey28654734
refterms.dateFOA2022-08-23T15:56:32Z
atmire.contributor.authoremailleah.honor@umassmed.eduen_US
html.description.abstract<p>Background: The degree of reproducibility of the neuroimaging literature in psychiatric application areas has been called into question and the issues that relate to this reproducibility are extremely complex. Some of these complexities have to do with the underlying biology of the disorders that we study and others arise due to the technology we apply to the analysis of the data we collect. Ultimately, the observations we make get communicated to the rest of the community through publications in the scientific literature.</p> <p>Methods: We sought to perform a ‘re-executability survey’ to evaluate the recent neuroimaging literature with an eye toward seeing if the technical aspects of our publication practices are helping or hindering the overall quest for a more reproducible understanding of brain development and aging. The topic areas examined include availability of the data, the precision of the imaging method description and the reporting of the statistical analytic approach, and the availability of the complete results. We applied the survey to 50 publications in the autism neuroimaging literature that were published between September 16, 2017 to October 1, 2018.</p> <p>Results: The results of the survey indicate that for the literature examined, data that is not already part of a public repository is rarely available, software tools are usually named but versions and operating system are not, it is expected that reasonably skilled analysts could approximately perform the analyses described, and the complete results of the studies are rarely available.</p> <p>Conclusions: We have identified that there is ample room for improvement in research publication practices. We hope exposing these issues in the retrospective literature can provide guidance and motivation for improving this aspect of our reporting practices in the future.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathfaculty_pubs/2191
dc.contributor.departmentLamar Soutter Library
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Psychiatry
dc.contributor.departmentEunice Kennedy Shriver Center
dc.source.pages1031


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
a856b73e_e66c_455d_8ade_183e7a ...
Size:
2.231Mb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Copyright:  © 2021 Hodge SM et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Copyright: © 2021 Hodge SM et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.