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dc.contributor.authorBetz, Marian E.
dc.contributor.authorBoudreaux, Edwin D.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:08:34.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T15:59:16Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T15:59:16Z
dc.date.issued2016-02-01
dc.date.submitted2016-03-07
dc.identifier.citationAnn Emerg Med. 2016 Feb;67(2):276-82. doi: 10.1016/j.annemergmed.2015.09.001. Epub 2015 Oct 9. <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.annemergmed.2015.09.001">Link to article on publisher's site</a>
dc.identifier.issn0196-0644 (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.annemergmed.2015.09.001
dc.identifier.pmid26443554
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/30628
dc.description.abstractCaring for ED patients with suicidal thoughts and behaviors is challenging, given time pressures, boarding of patients waiting for psychiatric beds, and the inherent difficulty in predicting imminent self-harm. However, providers—like patients—should not lose hope: most suicidal crises are short-lived and repeated attempts are not inevitable. Not every ED patient with suicidal thoughts needs inpatient admission or even a mental health consultation, and ED providers should take pride in their skills in caring for this at-risk population.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=26443554&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.annemergmed.2015.09.001
dc.subjectEmergency Medicine
dc.subjectPsychiatric and Mental Health
dc.subjectPsychiatry
dc.subjectPsychiatry and Psychology
dc.titleManaging Suicidal Patients in the Emergency Department
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleAnnals of emergency medicine
dc.source.volume67
dc.source.issue2
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/faculty_pubs/904
dc.identifier.contextkey8277647
html.description.abstract<p>Caring for ED patients with suicidal thoughts and behaviors is challenging, given time pressures, boarding of patients waiting for psychiatric beds, and the inherent difficulty in predicting imminent self-harm. However, providers—like patients—should not lose hope: most suicidal crises are short-lived and repeated attempts are not inevitable. Not every ED patient with suicidal thoughts needs inpatient admission or even a mental health consultation, and ED providers should take pride in their skills in caring for this at-risk population.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathfaculty_pubs/904
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Quantitative Health Sciences
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Psychiatry
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Emergency Medicine
dc.source.pages276-82


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