Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorDiFranza, Joseph R.
dc.contributor.authorSweet, Michael
dc.contributor.authorSavageau, Judith A.
dc.contributor.authorUrsprung, W. W. Sanouri A.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:08:35.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T16:00:20Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T16:00:20Z
dc.date.issued2011-12-01
dc.date.submitted2012-04-23
dc.identifier.citation<p>J Pediatr. 2011 Dec;159(6):999-1003.e1. Epub 2011 Jul 23. DOI 10.1016/j.jpeds.2011.05.037</p>
dc.identifier.issn0022-3476 (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jpeds.2011.05.037
dc.identifier.pmid21784437
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/30860
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: To determine whether adolescents' symptom reports are consistent with the developmental sequence of tobacco addiction and whether the sequential appearance of these symptoms signifies increasing addiction. STUDY DESIGN: An anonymous survey was administered to 349 tobacco users in grades 9 through 12 in Florida. The combinations of withdrawal symptoms reported were examined to determine whether they were consistent with the developmental sequence described by case reports (wanting, then craving, then needing). Dependence was measured by several validated measures, including the Hooked on Nicotine Checklist, the Autonomy Over Tobacco Scale, and the modified Fagerstrom Tolerance Questionnaire. RESULTS: The combinations of withdrawal symptoms reported by 99.4% of subjects were consistent with case reports stating that wanting, craving, and needing develop in that sequence. Across the stages, from wanting to needing, higher stages were associated with significant increases in the strength of addiction as measured by the Hooked on Nicotine Checklist, the Autonomy Over Tobacco Scale, the modified Fagerstrom Tolerance Questionnaire, and all other measures. CONCLUSIONS: Our data confirmed that withdrawal symptoms develop in an orderly sequence, as proposed, and indicate that each progressive step along the sequence of wanting, craving, and needing represents a substantial increase in tobacco addiction. This provides the foundation for a clinical approach to staging the progression of tobacco addiction.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=21784437&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2011.05.037
dc.subjectAdolescent
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectSeverity of Illness Index
dc.subjectTobacco Use Disorder
dc.subjectCommunity Health and Preventive Medicine
dc.subjectPreventive Medicine
dc.subjectPrimary Care
dc.titleAn evaluation of a clinical approach to staging tobacco addiction
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleThe Journal of pediatrics
dc.source.volume159
dc.source.issue6
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/fmch_articles/188
dc.identifier.contextkey2791479
html.description.abstract<p>OBJECTIVES: To determine whether adolescents' symptom reports are consistent with the developmental sequence of tobacco addiction and whether the sequential appearance of these symptoms signifies increasing addiction.</p> <p>STUDY DESIGN: An anonymous survey was administered to 349 tobacco users in grades 9 through 12 in Florida. The combinations of withdrawal symptoms reported were examined to determine whether they were consistent with the developmental sequence described by case reports (wanting, then craving, then needing). Dependence was measured by several validated measures, including the Hooked on Nicotine Checklist, the Autonomy Over Tobacco Scale, and the modified Fagerstrom Tolerance Questionnaire.</p> <p>RESULTS: The combinations of withdrawal symptoms reported by 99.4% of subjects were consistent with case reports stating that wanting, craving, and needing develop in that sequence. Across the stages, from wanting to needing, higher stages were associated with significant increases in the strength of addiction as measured by the Hooked on Nicotine Checklist, the Autonomy Over Tobacco Scale, the modified Fagerstrom Tolerance Questionnaire, and all other measures.</p> <p>CONCLUSIONS: Our data confirmed that withdrawal symptoms develop in an orderly sequence, as proposed, and indicate that each progressive step along the sequence of wanting, craving, and needing represents a substantial increase in tobacco addiction. This provides the foundation for a clinical approach to staging the progression of tobacco addiction.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathfmch_articles/188
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Family Medicine and Community Health
dc.source.pages999-1003.e1


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Publisher version

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record