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dc.contributor.authorDembe, Allard E.
dc.contributor.authorSavageau, Judith A.
dc.contributor.authorAmick, Benjamin C. III
dc.contributor.authorBanks, Steven M.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:08:35.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T16:00:23Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T16:00:23Z
dc.date.issued2005-04-01
dc.date.submitted2008-06-13
dc.identifier.citationJ Natl Med Assoc. 2005 Apr;97(4):498-507.
dc.identifier.issn0027-9684 (Print)
dc.identifier.pmid15868770
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/30872
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: This exploratory study uses nationally representative data to evaluate the extent to which ambulatory care for work-related conditions varies by patients' race and ethnicity. METHODS: Using the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) for 1997 and 1998, we describe medical care for work-related conditions, stratifying by whether the patient self-identified as African-American, white, Hispanic and/or non-Hispanic. Multivariate regression analyses were conducted to evaluate the impact of patient race and ethnicity on care, controlling for age, gender, geographical region and MSA (urban/rural) status. RESULTS: Compared to white patients, African-American patients were more likely to receive mental health counseling and physical therapy and less likely to see a nurse, after controlling for age, gender, geographical region and MSA status. Hispanic patients were more likely to receive x-rays and need insurer authorization for care and less likely to receive a prescription drug or to see a physician, compared to non-Hispanics. CONCLUSIONS: This is the nation's first study to describe socially based differences in medical care provided for patients with work-related injuries and illnesses. Identifying areas in which these variations in care exist is a critical first step in ensuring that equitable care is afforded to all injured workers.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=15868770&dopt=Abstract ">Link to article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2568699/pdf/jnma00185-0060.pdf
dc.subjectAccidents, Occupational
dc.subjectAdolescent
dc.subjectAdult
dc.subjectAged
dc.subjectAmbulatory Care
dc.subjectAttitude to Health
dc.subjectCohort Studies
dc.subjectConfidence Intervals
dc.subjectEthnic Groups
dc.subjectEuropean Continental Ancestry Group
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectLogistic Models
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectMiddle Aged
dc.subjectMultivariate Analysis
dc.subjectOdds Ratio
dc.subjectOutcome Assessment (Health Care)
dc.subjectPatient Care
dc.subjectProbability
dc.subjectRegistries
dc.subjectRisk Assessment
dc.subjectSocioeconomic Factors
dc.subjectUnited States
dc.subjectWorkplace
dc.subjectCommunity Health and Preventive Medicine
dc.subjectPreventive Medicine
dc.subjectPrimary Care
dc.titleRacial and ethnic variations in office-based medical care for work-related injuries and illnesses
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleJournal of the National Medical Association
dc.source.volume97
dc.source.issue4
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/fmch_articles/20
dc.identifier.contextkey525869
html.description.abstract<p>OBJECTIVES: This exploratory study uses nationally representative data to evaluate the extent to which ambulatory care for work-related conditions varies by patients' race and ethnicity.</p> <p>METHODS: Using the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) for 1997 and 1998, we describe medical care for work-related conditions, stratifying by whether the patient self-identified as African-American, white, Hispanic and/or non-Hispanic. Multivariate regression analyses were conducted to evaluate the impact of patient race and ethnicity on care, controlling for age, gender, geographical region and MSA (urban/rural) status.</p> <p>RESULTS: Compared to white patients, African-American patients were more likely to receive mental health counseling and physical therapy and less likely to see a nurse, after controlling for age, gender, geographical region and MSA status. Hispanic patients were more likely to receive x-rays and need insurer authorization for care and less likely to receive a prescription drug or to see a physician, compared to non-Hispanics.</p> <p>CONCLUSIONS: This is the nation's first study to describe socially based differences in medical care provided for patients with work-related injuries and illnesses. Identifying areas in which these variations in care exist is a critical first step in ensuring that equitable care is afforded to all injured workers.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathfmch_articles/20
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Family Medicine and Community Health
dc.source.pages498-507


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