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dc.contributor.authorDrew, Jacob
dc.contributor.authorCashman, Suzanne B
dc.contributor.authorSavageau, Judith A.
dc.contributor.authorStenger, Joseph
dc.date2022-08-11T08:08:36.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T16:00:45Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T16:00:45Z
dc.date.issued2006-09-01
dc.date.submitted2008-06-13
dc.identifier.citationJ Rural Health. 2006 Fall;22(4):294-9. <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1748-0361.2006.00049.x">Link to article on publisher's site</a>
dc.identifier.issn0890-765X (Print)
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1748-0361.2006.00049.x
dc.identifier.pmid17010025
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/30956
dc.description.abstractCONTEXT: Hospitals in rural communities may seek to increase specialty care access by establishing clinics staffed by visiting specialists. PURPOSE: To examine the visiting specialist care delivery model in Massachusetts, including reasons specialists develop secondary rural practices and distances they travel, as well as their degree of satisfaction and intention to continue the visiting arrangement. METHODS: Visiting specialists at 11 rural hospitals were asked to complete a mailed survey. FINDINGS: Visiting specialists were almost evenly split between the medical (54%) and surgical (46%) specialties, with ophthalmology, nephrology, and obstetrics/gynecology the most common specialties reported. A higher proportion of visiting specialists than specialists statewide were male (P = .001). Supplementing their patient base and income were the most important reasons visiting specialists reported for having initiated an ancillary clinic. There was a significant negative correlation between a hospital's number of staffed beds and the total number of visiting specialists it hosted (r =-0.573, P = .032); study hospitals ranged in bed size from 15 to 129. CONCLUSIONS: The goal of matching supply of health care services with demand has been elusive. Visiting specialist clinics may represent an element of a market structure that expands access to needed services in rural areas. They should be included in any enumeration of physician availability.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=17010025&dopt=Abstract ">Link to article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1748-0361.2006.00049.x
dc.subjectAdult
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectHealth Care Surveys
dc.subjectHealth Services Accessibility
dc.subjectHospitals, Rural
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectMassachusetts
dc.subjectMedically Underserved Area
dc.subjectMiddle Aged
dc.subjectPersonnel Staffing and Scheduling
dc.subjectRural Health Services
dc.subjectSpecialties, Medical
dc.subjectCommunity Health and Preventive Medicine
dc.subjectPreventive Medicine
dc.subjectPrimary Care
dc.titleThe visiting specialist model of rural health care delivery: a survey in Massachusetts
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleThe Journal of rural health : official journal of the American Rural Health Association and the National Rural Health Care Association
dc.source.volume22
dc.source.issue4
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/fmch_articles/29
dc.identifier.contextkey525878
html.description.abstract<p>CONTEXT: Hospitals in rural communities may seek to increase specialty care access by establishing clinics staffed by visiting specialists.</p> <p>PURPOSE: To examine the visiting specialist care delivery model in Massachusetts, including reasons specialists develop secondary rural practices and distances they travel, as well as their degree of satisfaction and intention to continue the visiting arrangement.</p> <p>METHODS: Visiting specialists at 11 rural hospitals were asked to complete a mailed survey.</p> <p>FINDINGS: Visiting specialists were almost evenly split between the medical (54%) and surgical (46%) specialties, with ophthalmology, nephrology, and obstetrics/gynecology the most common specialties reported. A higher proportion of visiting specialists than specialists statewide were male (P = .001). Supplementing their patient base and income were the most important reasons visiting specialists reported for having initiated an ancillary clinic. There was a significant negative correlation between a hospital's number of staffed beds and the total number of visiting specialists it hosted (r =-0.573, P = .032); study hospitals ranged in bed size from 15 to 129.</p> <p>CONCLUSIONS: The goal of matching supply of health care services with demand has been elusive. Visiting specialist clinics may represent an element of a market structure that expands access to needed services in rural areas. They should be included in any enumeration of physician availability.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathfmch_articles/29
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Orthopedics
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Family Medicine and Community Health
dc.source.pages294-9


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