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dc.contributor.authorChandra, Harish
dc.contributor.authorYarzebski, Jorge L.
dc.contributor.authorGoldberg, Robert J.
dc.contributor.authorSavageau, Judith A.
dc.contributor.authorSingleton, Colleen
dc.contributor.authorGurwitz, Jerry H.
dc.contributor.authorGore, Joel M.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:08:36.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T16:00:52Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T16:00:52Z
dc.date.issued1997-04-14
dc.date.submitted2008-06-12
dc.identifier.citationArch Intern Med. 1997 Apr 14;157(7):741-6.
dc.identifier.issn0003-9926 (Print)
dc.identifier.pmid9125005
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/30985
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: To examine age-related differences and temporal trends in the use of thrombolytic therapy in a community-wide study of patients hospitalized with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) between 1986 and 1993. METHODS: All hospitals in the Worcester, Mass, metropolitan area (1990 census population, 4370000) were included. A total of 3824 patients with validated AMI categorized according to age comprised the study sample: younger than 55 years (n = 577), 55 to 64 years (n = 758), 65 to 74 years (n = 1143), and 75 years or older (n = 1346). RESULTS: Use of thrombolytic therapy increased during the period under study in all patients hospitalized with AMI (9% in 1986; 26% in 1993). In 1986, the majority of treated patients received streptokinase; while increases over time in the use of tissue-type plasminogen activator were noted, streptokinase remained the thrombolytic agent of choice in 1993. Marked age-related trends in the use of thrombolytic therapy were observed, with the most striking increases in the use of thrombolytic therapy over time seen in those aged 65 years or older. Between 1986 and 1993 the relative increases in the use of thrombolytic therapy were observed in the following age groups: younger than 55 years (106%), 55 to 64 years (85%), 65 to 74 years (694%), and 75 years or older (571%). Despite these encouraging trends in the use of thrombolytic therapy in older patients, after controlling for a variety of potential confounding variables elderly patients were significantly less likely to receive thrombolytic therapy during hospitalization for AMI. Compared with patients aged 75 years or older, patients younger than 55 years were 6.4 times (95% confidence interval [CI], 4.8-8.5), patients aged 55 to 64 years were 4.9 times (95% CI, 3.8-6.4), and patients aged 65 to 74 years were 3.0 times (95% CI, 2.3-3.9) significantly more likely to receive thrombolytic therapy. These differences were in part related to the proportion of patients with myocardial infarction satisfying eligibility criteria for the receipt of thrombolytic therapy; patients aged 75 years or older were significantly less likely to meet these criteria (19%) than were those younger than 55 years (49%), those aged 55 to 64 years (38%), and those aged 65 to 74 years (28%). CONCLUSIONS: The present results show that while there have been substantial increases over time in the use of thrombolytic therapy in patients with AMI, most particularly in older individuals, the elderly remain appreciably less likely to receive these agents during hospitalization for AMI. These differences may be due to the smaller percentage of elderly patients satisfying criteria for the use of these agents compared with younger patients with coronary heart disease, as well as to a reluctance by physicians to use these agents in older patients. Continued monitoring of these trends remains important for examining changes in physicians' practice patterns regarding the use of thrombolytic therapy in this vulnerable population.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=9125005&dopt=Abstract ">Link to article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttp://archinte.jamanetwork.com/data/Journals/INTEMED/17532/archinte_157_7_004.pdf
dc.subjectAge Factors
dc.subjectAged
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectMassachusetts
dc.subjectMiddle Aged
dc.subjectMultivariate Analysis
dc.subjectMyocardial Infarction
dc.subjectRegression Analysis
dc.subjectThrombolytic Therapy
dc.subjectCommunity Health and Preventive Medicine
dc.subjectPreventive Medicine
dc.subjectPrimary Care
dc.titleAge-related trends (1986-1993) in the use of thrombolytic agents in patients with acute myocardial infarction. The Worcester Heart Attack Study
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitleArchives of internal medicine
dc.source.volume157
dc.source.issue7
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/fmch_articles/4
dc.identifier.contextkey523424
html.description.abstract<p>OBJECTIVE: To examine age-related differences and temporal trends in the use of thrombolytic therapy in a community-wide study of patients hospitalized with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) between 1986 and 1993.</p> <p>METHODS: All hospitals in the Worcester, Mass, metropolitan area (1990 census population, 4370000) were included. A total of 3824 patients with validated AMI categorized according to age comprised the study sample: younger than 55 years (n = 577), 55 to 64 years (n = 758), 65 to 74 years (n = 1143), and 75 years or older (n = 1346).</p> <p>RESULTS: Use of thrombolytic therapy increased during the period under study in all patients hospitalized with AMI (9% in 1986; 26% in 1993). In 1986, the majority of treated patients received streptokinase; while increases over time in the use of tissue-type plasminogen activator were noted, streptokinase remained the thrombolytic agent of choice in 1993. Marked age-related trends in the use of thrombolytic therapy were observed, with the most striking increases in the use of thrombolytic therapy over time seen in those aged 65 years or older. Between 1986 and 1993 the relative increases in the use of thrombolytic therapy were observed in the following age groups: younger than 55 years (106%), 55 to 64 years (85%), 65 to 74 years (694%), and 75 years or older (571%). Despite these encouraging trends in the use of thrombolytic therapy in older patients, after controlling for a variety of potential confounding variables elderly patients were significantly less likely to receive thrombolytic therapy during hospitalization for AMI. Compared with patients aged 75 years or older, patients younger than 55 years were 6.4 times (95% confidence interval [CI], 4.8-8.5), patients aged 55 to 64 years were 4.9 times (95% CI, 3.8-6.4), and patients aged 65 to 74 years were 3.0 times (95% CI, 2.3-3.9) significantly more likely to receive thrombolytic therapy. These differences were in part related to the proportion of patients with myocardial infarction satisfying eligibility criteria for the receipt of thrombolytic therapy; patients aged 75 years or older were significantly less likely to meet these criteria (19%) than were those younger than 55 years (49%), those aged 55 to 64 years (38%), and those aged 65 to 74 years (28%).</p> <p>CONCLUSIONS: The present results show that while there have been substantial increases over time in the use of thrombolytic therapy in patients with AMI, most particularly in older individuals, the elderly remain appreciably less likely to receive these agents during hospitalization for AMI. These differences may be due to the smaller percentage of elderly patients satisfying criteria for the use of these agents compared with younger patients with coronary heart disease, as well as to a reluctance by physicians to use these agents in older patients. Continued monitoring of these trends remains important for examining changes in physicians' practice patterns regarding the use of thrombolytic therapy in this vulnerable population.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathfmch_articles/4
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medicine, Division of Geriatric Medicine
dc.contributor.departmentMeyers Primary Care Institute
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Family Medicine and Community Health
dc.source.pages741-6


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