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dc.contributor.authorDickinson, L. Miriam
dc.contributor.authordeGruy, Frank Verloin
dc.contributor.authorDickinson, W. Perry
dc.contributor.authorCandib, Lucy M.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:08:36.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T16:00:55Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T16:00:55Z
dc.date.issued1999-01-01
dc.date.submitted2009-04-27
dc.identifier.citationArch Fam Med. 1999 Jan-Feb;8(1):35-43.
dc.identifier.issn1063-3987 (Print)
dc.identifier.pmid9932070
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/30998
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: To determine the association between severity of sexual abuse and psychiatric or medical problems in a sample of female patients from primary care medical settings and to assess the relationship between sexual abuse severity and health-related quality of life before and after controlling for the effects of a current psychiatric or medical diagnosis. DESIGN: Structured interview and self-report questionnaire. SETTING: Three family practice outpatient clinics. SUBJECTS: A total of 252 women selected by somatization status using a screen for unexplained physical symptoms. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Patient assessment after administering the Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short-Form Health Survey and self-report medical problems questionnaire; the quality-of-life scale developed by Andrews and Withey; Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Third Edition, Revised, diagnoses and symptom counts from the Diagnostic Interview Schedule; the Dissociative Experiences Scale; and the modified Dissociative Disorders Interview Schedule. RESULTS: A history of sexual abuse is associated with substantial impairment in health-related quality of life and a greater number of somatized symptoms (P < .001), medical problems (P < .01), and psychiatric symptoms and diagnoses (P < .001). In regression analyses, sexual abuse severity was a significant predictor of high scores on 6 of the 8 subscales of the Medical Outcomes Study Short-Form Health Survey (P < .05) and all of the quality-of-life subscales developed by Andrews and Withey (P < .01), with average decrements of up to 0.41 SDs for moderately abused women and 0.56 SDs for severely abused women. Furthermore, sexual abuse severity remained a significant predictor of high scores on the subscales mental health (P < .05), social functioning (P < .05), and quality of life (P < .05), even after adjusting for the presence of several common psychiatric diagnoses. CONCLUSIONS: Female primary care patients with a history of sexual abuse have more physical and psychiatric symptoms and lower health-related quality of life than those without previous abuse. In addition, a linear relationship exists between the severity of sexual abuse and impairment in health-related quality of life, both before and after controlling for the effects of a current psychiatric diagnosis.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=9932070&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.hawaii.edu/hivandaids/Health-Related_QOL_of_Female_Survivors_of_Sexual_Abuse.pdf
dc.subjectChild
dc.subjectChild Abuse, Sexual
dc.subjectChild, Preschool
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subject*Health Status
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectLinear Models
dc.subjectPrevalence
dc.subject*Quality of Life
dc.subjectQuestionnaires
dc.subjectSeverity of Illness Index
dc.subjectSex Offenses
dc.subjectUnited States
dc.subject*Women's Health
dc.subjectCommunity Health
dc.subjectOther Medical Specialties
dc.subjectPreventive Medicine
dc.titleHealth-related quality of life and symptom profiles of female survivors of sexual abuse
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitleArchives of family medicine
dc.source.volume8
dc.source.issue1
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/fmch_articles/53
dc.identifier.contextkey833456
html.description.abstract<p>OBJECTIVES: To determine the association between severity of sexual abuse and psychiatric or medical problems in a sample of female patients from primary care medical settings and to assess the relationship between sexual abuse severity and health-related quality of life before and after controlling for the effects of a current psychiatric or medical diagnosis.</p> <p>DESIGN: Structured interview and self-report questionnaire.</p> <p>SETTING: Three family practice outpatient clinics.</p> <p>SUBJECTS: A total of 252 women selected by somatization status using a screen for unexplained physical symptoms.</p> <p>MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Patient assessment after administering the Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short-Form Health Survey and self-report medical problems questionnaire; the quality-of-life scale developed by Andrews and Withey; Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Third Edition, Revised, diagnoses and symptom counts from the Diagnostic Interview Schedule; the Dissociative Experiences Scale; and the modified Dissociative Disorders Interview Schedule.</p> <p>RESULTS: A history of sexual abuse is associated with substantial impairment in health-related quality of life and a greater number of somatized symptoms (P < .001), medical problems (P < .01), and psychiatric symptoms and diagnoses (P < .001). In regression analyses, sexual abuse severity was a significant predictor of high scores on 6 of the 8 subscales of the Medical Outcomes Study Short-Form Health Survey (P < .05) and all of the quality-of-life subscales developed by Andrews and Withey (P < .01), with average decrements of up to 0.41 SDs for moderately abused women and 0.56 SDs for severely abused women. Furthermore, sexual abuse severity remained a significant predictor of high scores on the subscales mental health (P < .05), social functioning (P < .05), and quality of life (P < .05), even after adjusting for the presence of several common psychiatric diagnoses.</p> <p>CONCLUSIONS: Female primary care patients with a history of sexual abuse have more physical and psychiatric symptoms and lower health-related quality of life than those without previous abuse. In addition, a linear relationship exists between the severity of sexual abuse and impairment in health-related quality of life, both before and after controlling for the effects of a current psychiatric diagnosis.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathfmch_articles/53
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Family Medicine and Community Health
dc.source.pages35-43


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