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dc.contributor.advisorNancy Byatt
dc.contributor.authorXu, Wanlu
dc.date2022-08-11T08:08:39.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T16:02:46Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T16:02:46Z
dc.date.issued2021-03-31
dc.date.submitted2021-04-12
dc.identifier.doi10.13028/4qfy-ac94
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/31355
dc.description.abstractBackground Up to 34% of perinatal individuals experience childbirth as traumatic. These individuals are at increased risk for developing depression, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after the traumatic event. The objective of this study was to elicit the perspectives of individuals with a traumatic birth experience on barriers and facilitators to receiving mental health support in the postpartum period after a traumatic delivery. Methods Individuals who delivered within the last three years and perceived their birth experience to be traumatic (n=32) completed an hour-long semi-structured phone interview. The interview included screening for PTSD, depression, and anxiety with validated instruments including the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist for DSM-V (PCL-5), the Patient Health Questionnaire depression scale (PHQ-8), and the Generalized Anxiety Disorder scale (GAD-7), respectively. Qualitative data was analyzed using a modified grounded theory characterizing participants’ barriers and recommendations for mental health support after traumatic births. Results Among participants, 34.4% screened positive for PTSD, 18.8% screened positive for major depressive disorder, and 34.4% screened positive for anxiety. Qualitative themes revealed multi-level barriers involving lack of communication, education, and resources which prevented obstetric professionals from recognizing and supporting patients’ mental health needs after a traumatic birth. Recommendations from participants included that 1) obstetric professionals should acknowledge trauma experienced by any individual after childbirth, 2) providers of multiple disciplines need to be integrated into postpartum care, and 3) mental health support is needed before the ambulatory postpartum visit. Conclusions There are multi-level barriers toward detecting and responding to individuals’ mental health needs after a traumatic birth. Obstetric professionals need to use a trauma-informed approach and proactively follow-up and assess mental health care in the postpartum period.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.rightsCopyright is held by the author, with all rights reserved.
dc.subjectPerinatal mental health
dc.subjectbirth trauma
dc.subjecttraumatic birth
dc.subjectpostpartum mental health
dc.subjectOB/GYN
dc.subjectqualitative research
dc.subjectMaternal and Child Health
dc.subjectPsychiatric and Mental Health
dc.subjectWomen's Health
dc.titlePatient Perspectives on Barriers and Facilitators to Mental Health Support after a Traumatic Birth
dc.typeMaster's Thesis
dc.identifier.legacyfulltexthttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=2135&context=gsbs_diss&unstamped=1
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/1126
dc.legacy.embargo2022-04-12T00:00:00-07:00
dc.identifier.contextkey22454697
refterms.dateFOA2022-08-30T03:42:40Z
html.description.abstract<p><strong>Background</strong></p> <p>Up to 34% of perinatal individuals experience childbirth as traumatic. These individuals are at increased risk for developing depression, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after the traumatic event. The objective of this study was to elicit the perspectives of individuals with a traumatic birth experience on barriers and facilitators to receiving mental health support in the postpartum period after a traumatic delivery.</p> <p><strong>Methods</strong></p> <p>Individuals who delivered within the last three years and perceived their birth experience to be traumatic (n=32) completed an hour-long semi-structured phone interview. The interview included screening for PTSD, depression, and anxiety with validated instruments including the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist for DSM-V (PCL-5), the Patient Health Questionnaire depression scale (PHQ-8), and the Generalized Anxiety Disorder scale (GAD-7), respectively. Qualitative data was analyzed using a modified grounded theory characterizing participants’ barriers and recommendations for mental health support after traumatic births.</p> <p><strong>Results</strong></p> <p>Among participants, 34.4% screened positive for PTSD, 18.8% screened positive for major depressive disorder, and 34.4% screened positive for anxiety. Qualitative themes revealed multi-level barriers involving lack of communication, education, and resources which prevented obstetric professionals from recognizing and supporting patients’ mental health needs after a traumatic birth. Recommendations from participants included that 1) obstetric professionals should acknowledge trauma experienced by any individual after childbirth, 2) providers of multiple disciplines need to be integrated into postpartum care, and 3) mental health support is needed before the ambulatory postpartum visit.</p> <p><strong>Conclusions </strong></p> <p>There are multi-level barriers toward detecting and responding to individuals’ mental health needs after a traumatic birth. Obstetric professionals need to use a trauma-informed approach and proactively follow-up and assess mental health care in the postpartum period.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathgsbs_diss/1126
dc.contributor.departmentCenter for Clinical and Translational Science
dc.description.thesisprogramMaster of Science in Clinical Investigation
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0002-8838-9879


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