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dc.contributor.authorVallee, Richard B.
dc.contributor.authorShpetner, Howard S.
dc.contributor.authorPaschal, Bryce Mark
dc.date2022-08-11T08:08:50.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T16:09:32Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T16:09:32Z
dc.date.issued1989-02-01
dc.date.submitted2009-01-13
dc.identifier.citationTrends Neurosci. 1989 Feb;12(2):66-70.
dc.identifier.issn0166-2236 (Print)
dc.identifier.pmid2469213
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/32718
dc.description.abstractFast axonal transport is manifested at the sub-cellular level as the anterograde or retrograde movement of membrane-bounded organelles along microtubules. Earlier work implicated the protein kinesin as the motor for anterograde axonal transport. More recent work indicates that a brain microtubule-associated protein, MAP 1C, is responsible for retrograde transport. Of additional interest, MAP 1C has been found to be a cytoplasmic form of the ciliary and flagellar ATPase dynein, indicating a much more general functional role for this enzyme in cells than had been suspected.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=2469213&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0166-2236(89)90138-0
dc.subjectAdenosine Triphosphatases; Animals; Axonal Transport; Brain; Dynein ATPase; Models, Neurological; Neurons
dc.subjectLife Sciences
dc.subjectMedicine and Health Sciences
dc.titleThe role of dynein in retrograde axonal transport
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleTrends in neurosciences
dc.source.volume12
dc.source.issue2
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_sp/1274
dc.identifier.contextkey693202
html.description.abstract<p>Fast axonal transport is manifested at the sub-cellular level as the anterograde or retrograde movement of membrane-bounded organelles along microtubules. Earlier work implicated the protein kinesin as the motor for anterograde axonal transport. More recent work indicates that a brain microtubule-associated protein, MAP 1C, is responsible for retrograde transport. Of additional interest, MAP 1C has been found to be a cytoplasmic form of the ciliary and flagellar ATPase dynein, indicating a much more general functional role for this enzyme in cells than had been suspected.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathgsbs_sp/1274
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Cell Biology
dc.contributor.departmentGraduate School of Biomedical Sciences
dc.source.pages66-70


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