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dc.contributor.authorLi, Kai
dc.contributor.authorCasta, Alexandre
dc.contributor.authorWang, Rui
dc.contributor.authorLozada, Enerlyn M.
dc.contributor.authorFan, Wei
dc.contributor.authorKane, Susan E.
dc.contributor.authorGe, Qingyuan
dc.contributor.authorGu, Wei
dc.contributor.authorOrren, David K.
dc.contributor.authorLuo, Jianyuan
dc.date2022-08-11T08:08:51.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T16:09:49Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T16:09:49Z
dc.date.issued2008-01-22
dc.date.submitted2009-02-19
dc.identifier.citationJ Biol Chem. 2008 Mar 21;283(12):7590-8. Epub 2008 Jan 17. <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M709707200">Link to article on publisher's site</a>
dc.identifier.issn0021-9258 (Print)
dc.identifier.doi10.1074/jbc.M709707200
dc.identifier.pmid18203716
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/32790
dc.description.abstractWerner syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder associated with premature aging and cancer predisposition caused by mutations of the WRN gene. WRN is a member of the RecQ DNA helicase family with functions in maintaining genome stability. Sir2, an NAD-dependent histone deacetylase, has been proven to extend life span in yeast and Caenorhabditis elegans. Mammalian Sir2 (SIRT1) has also been found to regulate premature cellular senescence induced by the tumor suppressors PML and p53. SIRT1 plays an important role in cell survival promoted by calorie restriction. Here we show that SIRT1 interacts with WRN both in vitro and in vivo; this interaction is enhanced after DNA damage. WRN can be acetylated by acetyltransferase CBP/p300, and SIRT1 can deacetylate WRN both in vitro and in vivo. WRN acetylation decreases its helicase and exonuclease activities, and SIRT1 can reverse this effect. WRN acetylation alters its nuclear distribution. Down-regulation of SIRT1 reduces WRN translocation from nucleoplasm to nucleoli after DNA damage. These results suggest that SIRT1 regulates WRN-mediated cellular responses to DNA damage through deacetylation of WRN.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=18203716&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M709707200
dc.subjectAcetylation; Aging, Premature; Animals; Caenorhabditis elegans; Cell Aging; Cell Line; Cell Nucleus; DNA Damage; Down-Regulation; E1A-Associated p300 Protein; Exodeoxyribonucleases; Genomic Instability; Humans; Longevity; Neoplasm Proteins; Neoplasms; Nuclear Proteins; RecQ Helicases; Sirtuins; Transcription Factors; Tumor Suppressor Protein p53; Tumor Suppressor Proteins
dc.subjectLife Sciences
dc.subjectMedicine and Health Sciences
dc.titleRegulation of WRN protein cellular localization and enzymatic activities by SIRT1-mediated deacetylation
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleThe Journal of biological chemistry
dc.source.volume283
dc.source.issue12
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_sp/1343
dc.identifier.contextkey727538
html.description.abstract<p>Werner syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder associated with premature aging and cancer predisposition caused by mutations of the WRN gene. WRN is a member of the RecQ DNA helicase family with functions in maintaining genome stability. Sir2, an NAD-dependent histone deacetylase, has been proven to extend life span in yeast and Caenorhabditis elegans. Mammalian Sir2 (SIRT1) has also been found to regulate premature cellular senescence induced by the tumor suppressors PML and p53. SIRT1 plays an important role in cell survival promoted by calorie restriction. Here we show that SIRT1 interacts with WRN both in vitro and in vivo; this interaction is enhanced after DNA damage. WRN can be acetylated by acetyltransferase CBP/p300, and SIRT1 can deacetylate WRN both in vitro and in vivo. WRN acetylation decreases its helicase and exonuclease activities, and SIRT1 can reverse this effect. WRN acetylation alters its nuclear distribution. Down-regulation of SIRT1 reduces WRN translocation from nucleoplasm to nucleoli after DNA damage. These results suggest that SIRT1 regulates WRN-mediated cellular responses to DNA damage through deacetylation of WRN.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathgsbs_sp/1343
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Cancer Biology and the Cancer Center
dc.contributor.departmentGraduate School of Biomedical Sciences
dc.source.pages7590-8


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