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dc.contributor.authorSakhatskyy, Pavlo V.
dc.contributor.authorWang, Shixia
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Chuanyou
dc.contributor.authorChou, Te-Hui
dc.contributor.authorKishko, Michael G.
dc.contributor.authorLu, Shan
dc.date2022-08-11T08:08:51.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T16:09:52Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T16:09:52Z
dc.date.issued2008-02-05
dc.date.submitted2009-02-19
dc.identifier.citationVirology. 2008 Feb 5;371(1):98-107. Epub 2007 Oct 24. <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.virol.2007.09.029">Link to article on publisher's site</a>
dc.identifier.issn0042-6822 (Print)
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.virol.2007.09.029
dc.identifier.pmid17950773
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/32804
dc.description.abstractThe viral strain responsible for smallpox infection is variola major (VARV). As a result of the successful eradication of smallpox with the vaccinia virus (VACV), the general population is no longer required to receive a smallpox vaccine, and will have no protection against smallpox. This lack of immunity is a concern due to the potential for use of smallpox as a biological weapon. Considerable progress has been made in the development of subunit-based smallpox vaccines resulting from the identification of VACV protective antigens. It also offers the possibility of using antigens from VARV to formulate the next generation subunit-based smallpox vaccines. Here, we show that codon-optimized DNA vaccines expressing three VARV antigens (A30, B7 and F8) and their recombinant protein counterparts elicited high-titer, cross-reactive, VACV neutralizing antibody responses in mice. Vaccinated mice were protected from intraperitoneal and intranasal challenges with VACV. These results suggest the feasibility of a subunit smallpox vaccine based on VARV antigen sequences to induce immunity against poxvirus infection.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=17950773&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.virol.2007.09.029
dc.subjectAmino Acid Sequence; Animals; Antigens, Viral; Body Weight; Cell Line; Chemoprevention; Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay; Escherichia coli; Feasibility Studies; Female; Humans; Immunization Schedule; Immunoglobulin G; Kidney; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Models, Animal; Molecular Sequence Data; Neutralization Tests; Sequence Homology, Amino Acid; Smallpox; Smallpox Vaccine; Vaccines, Attenuated; Vaccines, DNA; Vaccines, Subunit; Vaccinia virus; Variola virus; *Viral Vaccines
dc.subjectImmunology and Infectious Disease
dc.subjectLife Sciences
dc.subjectMedicine and Health Sciences
dc.subjectMicrobiology
dc.titleImmunogenicity and protection efficacy of subunit-based smallpox vaccines using variola major antigens
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleVirology
dc.source.volume371
dc.source.issue1
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_sp/1358
dc.identifier.contextkey727553
html.description.abstract<p>The viral strain responsible for smallpox infection is variola major (VARV). As a result of the successful eradication of smallpox with the vaccinia virus (VACV), the general population is no longer required to receive a smallpox vaccine, and will have no protection against smallpox. This lack of immunity is a concern due to the potential for use of smallpox as a biological weapon. Considerable progress has been made in the development of subunit-based smallpox vaccines resulting from the identification of VACV protective antigens. It also offers the possibility of using antigens from VARV to formulate the next generation subunit-based smallpox vaccines. Here, we show that codon-optimized DNA vaccines expressing three VARV antigens (A30, B7 and F8) and their recombinant protein counterparts elicited high-titer, cross-reactive, VACV neutralizing antibody responses in mice. Vaccinated mice were protected from intraperitoneal and intranasal challenges with VACV. These results suggest the feasibility of a subunit smallpox vaccine based on VARV antigen sequences to induce immunity against poxvirus infection.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathgsbs_sp/1358
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases and Immunology
dc.source.pages98-107
dc.contributor.studentMichael G. Kishko


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