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dc.contributor.authorPirri, Jennifer K.
dc.contributor.authorAlkema, Mark J
dc.date2022-08-11T08:08:54.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T16:11:42Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T16:11:42Z
dc.date.issued2012-04-01
dc.date.submitted2012-02-28
dc.identifier.citationCurr Opin Neurobiol. 2012 Apr;22(2):187-93. doi: 10.1016/j.conb.2011.12.007. Epub 2012 Jan 4. <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.conb.2011.12.007">Link to article on publisher's site</a>
dc.identifier.issn0959-4388 (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.conb.2011.12.007
dc.identifier.pmid22226513
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/33231
dc.description.abstractEscape behaviors are crucial to survive predator encounters. Touch to the head of Caenorhabditis elegans induces an escape response where the animal rapidly backs away from the stimulus and suppresses foraging head movements. The coordination of head and body movements facilitates escape from predacious fungi that cohabitate with nematodes in organic debris. An appreciation of the natural habitat of laboratory organisms, like C. elegans, enables a comprehensive neuroethological analysis of behavior. In this review we discuss the neuronal mechanisms and the ecological significance of the C. elegans touch response.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=22226513&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3437330/
dc.subjectCaenorhabditis elegans; Caenorhabditis elegans Proteins; Escape Reaction; Touch Perception
dc.subjectNeuroscience and Neurobiology
dc.titleThe neuroethology of C. elegans escape
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleCurrent opinion in neurobiology
dc.source.volume22
dc.source.issue2
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_sp/1767
dc.identifier.contextkey2580891
html.description.abstract<p>Escape behaviors are crucial to survive predator encounters. Touch to the head of Caenorhabditis elegans induces an escape response where the animal rapidly backs away from the stimulus and suppresses foraging head movements. The coordination of head and body movements facilitates escape from predacious fungi that cohabitate with nematodes in organic debris. An appreciation of the natural habitat of laboratory organisms, like C. elegans, enables a comprehensive neuroethological analysis of behavior. In this review we discuss the neuronal mechanisms and the ecological significance of the C. elegans touch response.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathgsbs_sp/1767
dc.contributor.departmentGraduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Neuroscience Program
dc.contributor.departmentAlkema Lab
dc.contributor.departmentNeurobiology
dc.source.pages187-93
dc.contributor.studentJennifer K. Pirri
dc.description.thesisprogramNeuroscience


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