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dc.contributor.authorKim, Sung-Kwon
dc.contributor.authorCornberg, Markus
dc.contributor.authorWang, Xiaoting Z.
dc.contributor.authorChen, Hong D.
dc.contributor.authorSelin, Liisa K.
dc.contributor.authorWelsh, Raymond M.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:08:59.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T16:14:49Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T16:14:49Z
dc.date.issued2005-02-16
dc.date.submitted2008-10-15
dc.identifier.citationJ Exp Med. 2005 Feb 21;201(4):523-33. Epub 2005 Feb 14. <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1084/jem.20041337 ">Link to article on publisher's site</a>
dc.identifier.issn0022-1007 (Print)
dc.identifier.doi10.1084/jem.20041337
dc.identifier.pmid15710651
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/33951
dc.description.abstractCD8 T cell cross-reactivity between viruses can play roles in protective heterologous immunity and damaging immunopathology. This cross-reactivity is sometimes predictable, such as between lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) and Pichinde virus, where cross-reactive epitopes share six out of eight amino acids. Here, however, we demonstrate more subtle and less predictable cross-reactivity between LCMV and the unrelated vaccinia virus (VV). Epitope-specific T cell receptor usage differed between individual LCMV-infected C57BL/6 mice, even though the mice had similar epitope-specific T cell hierarchies. LCMV-immune mice challenged with VV showed variations, albeit in a distinct hierarchy, in proliferative expansions of and down-regulation of IL-7Ralpha by T cells specific to different LCMV epitopes. T cell responses to a VV-encoded epitope that is cross-reactive with LCMV fluctuated greatly in VV-infected LCMV-immune mice. Adoptive transfers of splenocytes from individual LCMV-immune donors resulted in nearly identical VV-induced responses in each of several recipients, but responses differed depending on the donor. This indicates that the specificities of T cell responses that are not shared between individuals may influence cross-reactivity with other antigens and play roles in heterologous immunity upon encounter with another pathogen. This variability in cross-reactive T cell expansion that is unique to the individual may underlie variation in the pathogenesis of infectious diseases.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=15710651&dopt=Abstract">Link to article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1084/jem.20041337
dc.subjectAdoptive Transfer; Animals; CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes; Cross Reactions; Epitopes, T-Lymphocyte; *Immunologic Memory; Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus; Male; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Receptors, Interleukin-7; Spleen; Vaccinia virus
dc.subjectLife Sciences
dc.subjectMedicine and Health Sciences
dc.titlePrivate specificities of CD8 T cell responses control patterns of heterologous immunity
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleThe Journal of experimental medicine
dc.source.volume201
dc.source.issue4
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_sp/603
dc.identifier.contextkey651073
html.description.abstract<p>CD8 T cell cross-reactivity between viruses can play roles in protective heterologous immunity and damaging immunopathology. This cross-reactivity is sometimes predictable, such as between lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) and Pichinde virus, where cross-reactive epitopes share six out of eight amino acids. Here, however, we demonstrate more subtle and less predictable cross-reactivity between LCMV and the unrelated vaccinia virus (VV). Epitope-specific T cell receptor usage differed between individual LCMV-infected C57BL/6 mice, even though the mice had similar epitope-specific T cell hierarchies. LCMV-immune mice challenged with VV showed variations, albeit in a distinct hierarchy, in proliferative expansions of and down-regulation of IL-7Ralpha by T cells specific to different LCMV epitopes. T cell responses to a VV-encoded epitope that is cross-reactive with LCMV fluctuated greatly in VV-infected LCMV-immune mice. Adoptive transfers of splenocytes from individual LCMV-immune donors resulted in nearly identical VV-induced responses in each of several recipients, but responses differed depending on the donor. This indicates that the specificities of T cell responses that are not shared between individuals may influence cross-reactivity with other antigens and play roles in heterologous immunity upon encounter with another pathogen. This variability in cross-reactive T cell expansion that is unique to the individual may underlie variation in the pathogenesis of infectious diseases.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathgsbs_sp/603
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Pathology
dc.contributor.departmentProgram in Immunology and Virology
dc.contributor.departmentGraduate School of Biomedical Sciences
dc.source.pages523-33


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