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dc.contributor.authorZimmerman, Wendy Cherie
dc.contributor.authorDoxsey, Stephen J.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:09:00.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T16:15:07Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T16:15:07Z
dc.date.issued2001-02-24
dc.date.submitted2008-10-16
dc.identifier.citation<p>Traffic. 2000 Dec;1(12):927-34.</p>
dc.identifier.issn1398-9219 (Print)
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1600-0854.2000.11202.x
dc.identifier.pmid11208082
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/34011
dc.description.abstractCentrosomes and other microtubule organizing centers are the largest non-membranous organelles in most cells. This morphologically diverse class of organelles shares a common ability to nucleate and organize microtubules in interphase and participates in the formation of mitotic spindles during cell division. This review summarizes recent evidence suggesting that assembly of centrosomes and mitotic spindle poles require transport of large protein particles along microtubules by the molecular motor cytoplasmic dynein.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<p><a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=11208082&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a></p>
dc.relation.urlhttps://doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0854.2000.11202.x
dc.subjectAnimals; Antigens; Autoantigens; Biological Transport; CHO Cells; *Cell Cycle Proteins; Centrosome; Cricetinae; Dynein ATPase; Microtubules; Mitotic Spindle Apparatus; Models, Molecular; Molecular Motor Proteins; Nuclear Proteins
dc.subjectLife Sciences
dc.subjectMedicine and Health Sciences
dc.titleConstruction of centrosomes and spindle poles by molecular motor-driven assembly of protein particles
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleTraffic (Copenhagen, Denmark)
dc.source.volume1
dc.source.issue12
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_sp/663
dc.identifier.contextkey652000
html.description.abstract<p>Centrosomes and other microtubule organizing centers are the largest non-membranous organelles in most cells. This morphologically diverse class of organelles shares a common ability to nucleate and organize microtubules in interphase and participates in the formation of mitotic spindles during cell division. This review summarizes recent evidence suggesting that assembly of centrosomes and mitotic spindle poles require transport of large protein particles along microtubules by the molecular motor cytoplasmic dynein.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathgsbs_sp/663
dc.contributor.departmentProgram in Molecular Medicine
dc.contributor.departmentGraduate School of Biomedical Sciences
dc.source.pages927-34


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