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dc.contributor.advisorSusan Sullivan-Bolyai
dc.contributor.authorCody, John Shawn
dc.date2022-08-11T08:09:03.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T16:16:39Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T16:16:39Z
dc.date.issued2015-04-21
dc.date.submitted2015-07-29
dc.identifier.doi10.13028/5kee-1603
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/34381
dc.description<p>Material from this dissertation has been published in: Cody, Reid-Ponte, Sullivan-Bolyai. Making A Connection: Family Experiences With ICU Bedside Rounds. <em>Critical Care Nurse (</em>In press)</p>
dc.description.abstractThe hospitalization of a family member in an intensive care unit can be a very stressful time for the family. Family bedside rounds is one way for the care team to inform family members, answer questions, and involve them in care decisions. Few studies have examined the experiences of family members with ICU bedside rounds. A qualitative descriptive study, undergirded by the Family Management Style Framework developed by Knafl and Deatrick (1990, 2003) and Knafl, Deatrick, and Havill (2012), was done at an academic medical center examining families who both participated and did not participate in the family bedside rounds. The majority of families who participated (80%) found the process helpful. One overarching theme emerged from the data of participating families: Making a Connection: Comfort and Confidence. Two major factors influenced how that connection was made: consistency and preparing families for the future. Three types of consistency were identified: consistency with information being shared, consistency about when rounds were being held, and consistency with being informed of delays. The second major contributing factor was preparing families for the future. When a connection was present, families felt comfortable with the situation. When any of the factors were missing, families described feelings of anger, frustration, and fear. Family members who did not participate described feelings of disappointment and frustration about not having participated. As healthcare providers, what we say to families matters. They need to be included in decision-making with honest, consistent, easy-to-understand information.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.rights© Copyright by Shawn Cody 2015. All Rights Reserved
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjecthospitalization
dc.subjectintensive care unit
dc.subjectbedside rounds
dc.subjectfamilies
dc.subjectIntensive Care
dc.subjectCritical Care Nursing
dc.subjectFamily
dc.subjectProfessional-Family Relations
dc.subjectTeaching Rounds
dc.subjectDecision Making
dc.subjectCritical Care
dc.subjectCritical Care Nursing
dc.subjectNursing
dc.titleFamily Experiences with ICU Bedside Rounds: A Qualitative Descriptive Study: A Dissertation
dc.typeDoctoral Dissertation
dc.identifier.legacyfulltexthttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1045&amp;context=gsn_diss&amp;unstamped=1
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsn_diss/35
dc.legacy.embargo2016-10-21T00:00:00-07:00
dc.identifier.contextkey7384132
refterms.dateFOA2022-08-24T03:22:30Z
html.description.abstract<p>The hospitalization of a family member in an intensive care unit can be a very stressful time for the family. Family bedside rounds is one way for the care team to inform family members, answer questions, and involve them in care decisions. Few studies have examined the experiences of family members with ICU bedside rounds.</p> <p>A qualitative descriptive study, undergirded by the Family Management Style Framework developed by Knafl and Deatrick (1990, 2003) and Knafl, Deatrick, and Havill (2012), was done at an academic medical center examining families who both participated and did not participate in the family bedside rounds. The majority of families who participated (80%) found the process helpful. One overarching theme emerged from the data of participating families: Making a Connection: Comfort and Confidence. Two major factors influenced how that connection was made: consistency and preparing families for the future. Three types of consistency were identified: consistency with information being shared, consistency about when rounds were being held, and</p> <p>consistency with being informed of delays. The second major contributing factor was preparing families for the future. When a connection was present, families felt comfortable with the situation. When any of the factors were missing, families described feelings of anger, frustration, and fear. Family members who did not participate described feelings of disappointment and frustration about not having participated.</p> <p>As healthcare providers, what we say to families matters. They need to be included in decision-making with honest, consistent, easy-to-understand information.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathgsn_diss/35
dc.contributor.departmentGraduate School of Nursing


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© Copyright by Shawn Cody 2015. All Rights Reserved
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © Copyright by Shawn Cody 2015. All Rights Reserved