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dc.contributor.authorDurante, Amanda J.
dc.contributor.authorBova, Carol A.
dc.contributor.authorFennie, Kristopher P.
dc.contributor.authorDanvers, Karina A.
dc.contributor.authorHolness, Danielle R.
dc.contributor.authorBurgess, Jane D.
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Ann B.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:09:04.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T16:17:02Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T16:17:02Z
dc.date.issued2003-03-27
dc.date.submitted2008-06-16
dc.identifier.citationAIDS Care. 2003 Feb;15(1):103-15.
dc.identifier.issn0954-0121 (Print)
dc.identifier.pmid12655838
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/34466
dc.description.abstractCollection of antiretroviral medication adherence data in the homes of HIV-infected people may have methodological advantages that can improve data quality. However, the feasibility of this approach has not been established. In addition, data on adherence, and its predictors, among HIV-infected women have been limited. Sixty-three HIV-positive women who were prescribed at least one antiretroviral drug in the last month were interviewed in their homes. A standard instrument was used to collect data on all antiretroviral medications prescribed and taken in the three days prior to the interview. Data were also collected on factors thought potentially to affect the ability to be adherent. The results of this study suggest that it is feasible to conduct home-based adherence research. Sixty-seven per cent reported taking all prescribed antiretroviral medication doses. One-third took a sub-optimal dose putting themselves at increased risk of treatment failure and the selection of resistant HIV strains. Unintentional reasons for missing doses were most commonly reported. An ability to describe the intended effect of antiretroviral therapy on HIV viral load was the best predictor of adherence. This finding is consistent with other research suggesting that adherence is associated with an understanding and belief in the effectiveness of antiretroviral therapy.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=12655838&dopt=Abstract ">Link to article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/0954012021000039806
dc.subjectAcquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
dc.subjectAdult
dc.subjectAnti-HIV Agents
dc.subjectAntigens, CD4
dc.subjectCross-Sectional Studies
dc.subjectFeasibility Studies
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectHIV Seropositivity
dc.subjectHospitalization
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectMiddle Aged
dc.subjectPatient Compliance
dc.subjectPilot Projects
dc.subjectSocial Support
dc.subjectViral Load
dc.subjectNursing
dc.subjectPublic Health and Community Nursing
dc.titleHome-based study of anti-HIV drug regimen adherence among HIV-infected women: feasibility and preliminary results
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleAIDS care
dc.source.volume15
dc.source.issue1
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsn_pp/14
dc.identifier.contextkey531229
html.description.abstract<p>Collection of antiretroviral medication adherence data in the homes of HIV-infected people may have methodological advantages that can improve data quality. However, the feasibility of this approach has not been established. In addition, data on adherence, and its predictors, among HIV-infected women have been limited. Sixty-three HIV-positive women who were prescribed at least one antiretroviral drug in the last month were interviewed in their homes. A standard instrument was used to collect data on all antiretroviral medications prescribed and taken in the three days prior to the interview. Data were also collected on factors thought potentially to affect the ability to be adherent. The results of this study suggest that it is feasible to conduct home-based adherence research. Sixty-seven per cent reported taking all prescribed antiretroviral medication doses. One-third took a sub-optimal dose putting themselves at increased risk of treatment failure and the selection of resistant HIV strains. Unintentional reasons for missing doses were most commonly reported. An ability to describe the intended effect of antiretroviral therapy on HIV viral load was the best predictor of adherence. This finding is consistent with other research suggesting that adherence is associated with an understanding and belief in the effectiveness of antiretroviral therapy.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathgsn_pp/14
dc.contributor.departmentCenter for Infectious Disease and Vaccine Research
dc.contributor.departmentGraduate School of Nursing
dc.source.pages103-15


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