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dc.contributor.authorFennie, Kristopher P.
dc.contributor.authorBova, Carol A
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Ann B.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:09:05.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T16:17:12Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T16:17:12Z
dc.date.issued2006-11-30
dc.date.submitted2008-06-16
dc.identifier.citationJ Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2006 Dec 1;43 Suppl 1:S88-95. <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.qai.0000248336.97814.2f">Link to article on publisher's site</a>
dc.identifier.issn1525-4135 (Print)
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/01.qai.0000248336.97814.2f
dc.identifier.pmid17133208
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/34506
dc.description.abstractElectronic monitoring device (EMD) data are widely used to measure adherence in HIV medication adherence research. EMD data represent an objective measure of adherence and arguably provide more valid data than other methods such as self-reported measures, pill counts, and drug level concentration. Moreover, EMD data are longitudinal, include many measurements, and yield a rich data set. This article illustrates potential pitfalls associated with this measurement technique, including lack of clarity associated with EMD data, and the extent to which adherence outcomes are affected by data management decisions. Recommendations are given regarding what information should be included in publications that report results based on EMD data so as to facilitate comparisons between studies.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=17133208&dopt=Abstract ">Link to article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.qai.0000248336.97814.2f
dc.subjectAnti-HIV Agents
dc.subjectData Collection
dc.subjectDrug Monitoring
dc.subjectDrug Packaging
dc.subjectHIV Infections
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectMedical Records
dc.subjectPatient Compliance
dc.subjectResearch
dc.subjectNursing
dc.subjectPublic Health and Community Nursing
dc.titleAdjusting and censoring electronic monitoring device data. Implications for study outcomes
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleJournal of acquired immune deficiency syndromes (1999)
dc.source.volume43 Suppl 1
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsn_pp/2
dc.identifier.contextkey530685
html.description.abstract<p>Electronic monitoring device (EMD) data are widely used to measure adherence in HIV medication adherence research. EMD data represent an objective measure of adherence and arguably provide more valid data than other methods such as self-reported measures, pill counts, and drug level concentration. Moreover, EMD data are longitudinal, include many measurements, and yield a rich data set. This article illustrates potential pitfalls associated with this measurement technique, including lack of clarity associated with EMD data, and the extent to which adherence outcomes are affected by data management decisions. Recommendations are given regarding what information should be included in publications that report results based on EMD data so as to facilitate comparisons between studies.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathgsn_pp/2
dc.contributor.departmentCenter for Infectious Disease and Vaccine Research
dc.contributor.departmentGraduate School of Nursing
dc.source.pagesS88-95


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