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dc.contributor.authorMitra, Monika
dc.contributor.authorIezzoni, Lisa I.
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Jianying
dc.contributor.authorLong-Bellil, Linda M.
dc.contributor.authorSmeltzer, Suzanne C.
dc.contributor.authorBarton, Bruce A.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:09:06.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T16:17:55Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T16:17:55Z
dc.date.issued2015-02-01
dc.date.submitted2016-09-01
dc.identifier.citationMitra M, Iezzoni LI, Zhang J, Long-Bellil LM, Smeltzer SC, Barton BA. Prevalence and risk factors for postpartum depression symptoms among women with disabilities. Matern Child Health J. 2015 Feb;19(2):362-72. doi:10.1007/s10995-014-1518-8. PubMed PMID: 24889114; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4254905. <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10995-014-1518-8">Link to article on publisher's website</a>
dc.identifier.issn1573-6628
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10995-014-1518-8
dc.identifier.pmid24889114
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/34690
dc.description.abstractThe adverse consequences of postpartum depression on the health of the mother and her child are well documented. However, there is little information on postpartum depression among mothers with disabilities. This study examines the patterns of depression and depressive symptoms before, during and after pregnancy and the association between depression before and during pregnancy and postpartum depression symptomatology (PPD) among women with and without disabilities. Data from the 2009-2011 Rhode Island Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) were analyzed in 2013. Almost 30% (28.9%; 95% CI 22.8-35.8) of mothers with disabilities reported often or always feeling down, depressed or sad after childbirth compared to 10% of those without disabilities (95% CI 8.9-11.3). Compared to other women in the study, women with disabilities had a greater likelihood for PPD symptoms (RR 1.6, 95% CI 1.1-2.2) after accounting for sociodemographics, maternal characteristics related to PPD, and depression before and during pregnancy. Adjusting for other covariates, self-reported prenatal diagnosis of depression was not associated with symptoms of PPD and depression during pregnancy was marginally associated with PPD symptomatology for women with disabilities. Women with disabilities are at a greater risk of experiencing symptoms of postpartum depression than other women. Screening for PPD among new mothers with disabilities and timely referral of those with PPD diagnosis are vital to the health of mothers with disabilities and their children.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherKluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=24889114&dopt=Abstract">Link to article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4254905/
dc.subjectdisability
dc.subjectpostpartum depression
dc.subjectwomen with disabilities
dc.subjectpregnancy
dc.subjectClinical Epidemiology
dc.subjectEpidemiology
dc.subjectFemale Urogenital Diseases and Pregnancy Complications
dc.subjectHealth Services Administration
dc.subjectHealth Services Research
dc.subjectMaternal and Child Health
dc.subjectPublic Health
dc.subjectWomen's Health
dc.titlePrevalence and risk factors for postpartum depression symptoms among women with disabilities
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleMaternal and child health journal
dc.source.volume19
dc.source.issue2
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/healthpolicy_pp/195
dc.identifier.contextkey9064301
html.description.abstract<p>The adverse consequences of postpartum depression on the health of the mother and her child are well documented. However, there is little information on postpartum depression among mothers with disabilities. This study examines the patterns of depression and depressive symptoms before, during and after pregnancy and the association between depression before and during pregnancy and postpartum depression symptomatology (PPD) among women with and without disabilities. Data from the 2009-2011 Rhode Island Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) were analyzed in 2013. Almost 30% (28.9%; 95% CI 22.8-35.8) of mothers with disabilities reported often or always feeling down, depressed or sad after childbirth compared to 10% of those without disabilities (95% CI 8.9-11.3). Compared to other women in the study, women with disabilities had a greater likelihood for PPD symptoms (RR 1.6, 95% CI 1.1-2.2) after accounting for sociodemographics, maternal characteristics related to PPD, and depression before and during pregnancy. Adjusting for other covariates, self-reported prenatal diagnosis of depression was not associated with symptoms of PPD and depression during pregnancy was marginally associated with PPD symptomatology for women with disabilities. Women with disabilities are at a greater risk of experiencing symptoms of postpartum depression than other women. Screening for PPD among new mothers with disabilities and timely referral of those with PPD diagnosis are vital to the health of mothers with disabilities and their children.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathhealthpolicy_pp/195
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Quantitative Health Sciences
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Family Medicine and Community Health
dc.contributor.departmentCenter for Health Policy and Research, Commonwealth Medicine
dc.source.pages362-72


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