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dc.contributor.authorCochran, David M
dc.contributor.authorSikoglu, Elif M.
dc.contributor.authorHodge, Steven M
dc.contributor.authorEdden, Richard A.E.
dc.contributor.authorFoley, Ann
dc.contributor.authorKennedy, David N.
dc.contributor.authorMoore, Constance M.
dc.contributor.authorFrazier, Jean A.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:09:08.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T16:18:28Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T16:18:28Z
dc.date.issued2015-05-01
dc.date.submitted2015-06-09
dc.identifier.citationCochran DM, Sikoglu EM, Hodge SM, Edden RA, Foley A, Kennedy DN, Moore CM, Frazier JA. Relationship among Glutamine, γ-Aminobutyric Acid, and Social Cognition in Autism Spectrum Disorders. J Child Adolesc Psychopharmacol. 2015 May;25(4):314-22. doi: 10.1089/cap.2014.0112. Epub 2015 Apr 28. PubMed PMID: 25919578; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4442578. <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/cap.2014.0112">Link to article on publisher's site</a>
dc.identifier.issn1044-5463 (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.1089/cap.2014.0112
dc.identifier.pmid25919578
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/34824
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: An imbalance of excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has been proposed. We compared glutamate (Glu), glutamine (Gln), and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) levels in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) of 13 males with ASD and 14 typically developing (TD) males (ages 13-17), and correlated these levels with intelligence quotient (IQ) and measures of social cognition. METHODS: Social cognition was evaluated by administration of the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS) and the Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test (RMET). We acquired proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) data from the bilateral ACC using the single voxel point resolved spectroscopy sequence (PRESS) to quantify Glu and Gln, and Mescher-Garwood point-resolved spectroscopy sequence (MEGA-PRESS) to quantify GABA levels referenced to creatine (Cr). RESULTS: There were higher Gln levels (p=0.04), and lower GABA/Cre levels (p=0.09) in the ASD group than in the TD group. There was no difference in Glu levels between groups. Gln was negatively correlated with RMET score (rho=-0.62, p=0.001) and IQ (rho=-0.56, p=0.003), and positively correlated with SRS scores (rho=0.53, p=0.007). GABA/Cre levels were positively correlated with RMET score (rho=0.34, p=0.09) and IQ (rho=0.36, p=0.07), and negatively correlated with SRS score (rho=-0.34, p=0.09). CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest an imbalance between glutamatergic neurotransmission and GABA-ergic neurotransmission in ASD. Higher Gln levels and lower GABA/Cre levels were associated with lower IQ and greater impairments in social cognition across groups.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=25919578&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1089/cap.2014.0112
dc.subjectChemicals and Drugs
dc.subjectCognitive Neuroscience
dc.subjectMedicinal Chemistry and Pharmaceutics
dc.subjectMental Disorders
dc.subjectNeuroscience and Neurobiology
dc.subjectNeurosciences
dc.subjectPediatrics
dc.subjectPsychiatry
dc.subjectPsychiatry and Psychology
dc.titleRelationship among Glutamine, gamma-Aminobutyric Acid, and Social Cognition in Autism Spectrum Disorders
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleJournal of child and adolescent psychopharmacology
dc.source.volume25
dc.source.issue4
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/iddrc_pubs/45
dc.identifier.contextkey7195556
html.description.abstract<p>OBJECTIVE: An imbalance of excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has been proposed. We compared glutamate (Glu), glutamine (Gln), and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) levels in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) of 13 males with ASD and 14 typically developing (TD) males (ages 13-17), and correlated these levels with intelligence quotient (IQ) and measures of social cognition.</p> <p>METHODS: Social cognition was evaluated by administration of the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS) and the Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test (RMET). We acquired proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) data from the bilateral ACC using the single voxel point resolved spectroscopy sequence (PRESS) to quantify Glu and Gln, and Mescher-Garwood point-resolved spectroscopy sequence (MEGA-PRESS) to quantify GABA levels referenced to creatine (Cr).</p> <p>RESULTS: There were higher Gln levels (p=0.04), and lower GABA/Cre levels (p=0.09) in the ASD group than in the TD group. There was no difference in Glu levels between groups. Gln was negatively correlated with RMET score (rho=-0.62, p=0.001) and IQ (rho=-0.56, p=0.003), and positively correlated with SRS scores (rho=0.53, p=0.007). GABA/Cre levels were positively correlated with RMET score (rho=0.34, p=0.09) and IQ (rho=0.36, p=0.07), and negatively correlated with SRS score (rho=-0.34, p=0.09).</p> <p>CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest an imbalance between glutamatergic neurotransmission and GABA-ergic neurotransmission in ASD. Higher Gln levels and lower GABA/Cre levels were associated with lower IQ and greater impairments in social cognition across groups.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathiddrc_pubs/45
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Psychiatry, Child and Adolescent NeuroDevelopment Initiative, Center for Comparative NeuroImaging
dc.contributor.departmentIntellectual and Developmental Disabilities Research Center
dc.source.pages314-22


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