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dc.contributor.authorStanish, Heidi I.
dc.contributor.authorCurtin, Carol
dc.contributor.authorMust, Aviva
dc.contributor.authorPhillips, Sarah
dc.contributor.authorMaslin, Melissa C. T.
dc.contributor.authorBandini, Linda G
dc.date2022-08-11T08:09:08.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T16:18:29Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T16:18:29Z
dc.date.issued2015-04-01
dc.date.submitted2015-06-09
dc.identifier.citationStanish HI, Curtin C, Must A, Phillips S, Maslin M, Bandini LG. Physical Activity Enjoyment, Perceived Barriers, and Beliefs Among Adolescents With and Without Intellectual Disabilities. J Phys Act Health. 2015 Apr 1. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 25830443. PubMed Central PMCID: NIHMS697578. <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1123/jpah.2014-0548">Link to article on publisher's site</a>
dc.identifier.issn1543-3080 (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.1123/jpah.2014-0548
dc.identifier.pmid25830443
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/34826
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Youth with intellectual disabilities (ID) exhibit low levels of physical activity, but the underlying contributors to behavior are unclear. We compared physical activity enjoyment, perceived barriers, beliefs, and self-efficacy among adolescents with ID and typically developing (TD) adolescents. METHODS: A questionnaire was administered to 38 adolescents with ID (mean age 16.8 years) and 60 TD adolescents (mean age 15.3 years). Of the original 33 questionnaire items, 23 met the test-retest reliability criteria and were included in the group comparisons. RESULTS: Fewer adolescents with ID reported that they have someone to do physical activity with (64% vs. 93%, p < 0.001), and a greater proportion of adolescents with ID perceived that physical activities were too hard to learn (41% vs. 0%, p < 0.001). Fewer adolescents with ID believed that physical activity is good for their health (92% vs. 100%, p=0.05). More adolescents with ID reported a dislike of individual physical activities (p=0.02). A large proportion of adolescents with ID (84%) responded that they were good at doing physical activities, but the difference between groups was only of borderline significance. (95% of TD adolescents, p=0.06). CONCLUSIONS: Adolescents shared many of the same perceptions about physical activity, but some important differences between groups were identified.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=25830443&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1123/jpah.2014-0548
dc.subjectCommunity Health
dc.subjectCommunity Health and Preventive Medicine
dc.subjectExercise Science
dc.subjectMental Disorders
dc.subjectPsychiatry and Psychology
dc.titlePhysical Activity Enjoyment, Perceived Barriers, and Beliefs Among Adolescents With and Without Intellectual Disabilities
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleJournal of physical activity and health
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/iddrc_pubs/47
dc.identifier.contextkey7195558
html.description.abstract<p>BACKGROUND: Youth with intellectual disabilities (ID) exhibit low levels of physical activity, but the underlying contributors to behavior are unclear. We compared physical activity enjoyment, perceived barriers, beliefs, and self-efficacy among adolescents with ID and typically developing (TD) adolescents.</p> <p>METHODS: A questionnaire was administered to 38 adolescents with ID (mean age 16.8 years) and 60 TD adolescents (mean age 15.3 years). Of the original 33 questionnaire items, 23 met the test-retest reliability criteria and were included in the group comparisons.</p> <p>RESULTS: Fewer adolescents with ID reported that they have someone to do physical activity with (64% vs. 93%, p < 0.001), and a greater proportion of adolescents with ID perceived that physical activities were too hard to learn (41% vs. 0%, p < 0.001). Fewer adolescents with ID believed that physical activity is good for their health (92% vs. 100%, p=0.05). More adolescents with ID reported a dislike of individual physical activities (p=0.02). A large proportion of adolescents with ID (84%) responded that they were good at doing physical activities, but the difference between groups was only of borderline significance. (95% of TD adolescents, p=0.06).</p> <p>CONCLUSIONS: Adolescents shared many of the same perceptions about physical activity, but some important differences between groups were identified.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathiddrc_pubs/47
dc.contributor.departmentEunice Kennedy Shriver Center
dc.contributor.departmentIntellectual and Developmental Disabilities Research Center


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