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dc.contributor.authorCollins, James W.
dc.contributor.authorKeeney, Kristie M.
dc.contributor.authorCrepin, Valerie F.
dc.contributor.authorRathinam, Vijay A. K.
dc.contributor.authorFitzgerald, Katherine A.
dc.contributor.authorFinlay, B. Brett
dc.contributor.authorFrankel, Gad
dc.date2022-08-11T08:09:08.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T16:19:00Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T16:19:00Z
dc.date.issued2014-09-01
dc.date.submitted2014-11-26
dc.identifier.citationNat Rev Microbiol. 2014 Sep;12(9):612-23. doi: 10.1038/nrmicro3315. Epub 2014 Aug 4. <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nrmicro3315">Link to article on publisher's site</a>
dc.identifier.issn1740-1526 (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/nrmicro3315
dc.identifier.pmid25088150
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/34944
dc.description.abstractCitrobacter rodentium is a mucosal pathogen of mice that shares several pathogenic mechanisms with enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) and enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC), which are two clinically important human gastrointestinal pathogens. Thus, C. rodentium has long been used as a model to understand the molecular basis of EPEC and EHEC infection in vivo. In this Review, we discuss recent studies in which C. rodentium has been used to study mucosal immunology, including the deregulation of intestinal inflammatory responses during bacteria-induced colitis and the role of the intestinal microbiota in mediating resistance to colonization by enteric pathogens. These insights should help to elucidate the roles of mucosal inflammatory responses and the microbiota in the virulence of enteric pathogens.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=25088150&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nrmicro3315
dc.subjectAnimals
dc.subjectCitrobacter rodentium
dc.subjectColitis
dc.subjectColon
dc.subjectDiet
dc.subjectEnterobacteriaceae Infections
dc.subjectEnterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli
dc.subjectEnteropathogenic Escherichia coli
dc.subjectEpithelium
dc.subject*Host-Pathogen Interactions
dc.subjectImmunity, Mucosal
dc.subjectIntestine, Large
dc.subjectMice
dc.subject*Microbiota
dc.subjectSignal Transduction
dc.subjectVirulence
dc.subjectBacteria
dc.subjectDigestive System
dc.subjectImmunity
dc.subjectImmunology and Infectious Disease
dc.subjectImmunology of Infectious Disease
dc.subjectInfectious Disease
dc.subjectPathogenic Microbiology
dc.titleCitrobacter rodentium: infection, inflammation and the microbiota
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleNature reviews. Microbiology
dc.source.volume12
dc.source.issue9
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/infdis_pp/167
dc.identifier.contextkey6399364
html.description.abstract<p>Citrobacter rodentium is a mucosal pathogen of mice that shares several pathogenic mechanisms with enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) and enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC), which are two clinically important human gastrointestinal pathogens. Thus, C. rodentium has long been used as a model to understand the molecular basis of EPEC and EHEC infection in vivo. In this Review, we discuss recent studies in which C. rodentium has been used to study mucosal immunology, including the deregulation of intestinal inflammatory responses during bacteria-induced colitis and the role of the intestinal microbiota in mediating resistance to colonization by enteric pathogens. These insights should help to elucidate the roles of mucosal inflammatory responses and the microbiota in the virulence of enteric pathogens.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathinfdis_pp/167
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases and Immunology
dc.source.pages612-23


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