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dc.contributor.authorManuell, Mary-Elise
dc.contributor.authorCo, Mary Dawn T.
dc.contributor.authorEllison, Richard T. III
dc.date2022-08-11T08:09:09.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T16:19:11Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T16:19:11Z
dc.date.issued2011-11-01
dc.date.submitted2015-12-07
dc.identifier.citationJ Intensive Care Med. 2011 Nov-Dec;26(6):347-67. doi: 10.1177/0885066610393314. Epub 2011 Jan 10. <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0885066610393314">Link to article on publisher's site</a>
dc.identifier.issn0885-0666 (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0885066610393314
dc.identifier.pmid21220275
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/34987
dc.description.abstractIn a 5-week span during the 1918 influenza A pandemic, more than 2000 patients were admitted to Cook County Hospital in Chicago, with a diagnosis of either influenza or pneumonia; 642 patients, approximately 31% of those admitted, died, with deaths occurring predominantly in patients of age 25 to 30 years. This review summarizes basic information on the biology, epidemiology, control, treatment and prevention of influenza overall, and then addresses the potential impact of pandemic influenza in an intensive care unit setting. Issues that require consideration include workforce staffing and safety, resource management, alternate sites of care surge of patients, altered standards of care, and crisis communication.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=21220275&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4110744/
dc.subjectCritical Care
dc.subjectDelivery of Health Care
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectInfection Control
dc.subject*Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype
dc.subjectInfluenza, Human
dc.subjectIntensive Care Units
dc.subjectPandemics
dc.subjectCritical Care
dc.subjectEmergency Medicine
dc.subjectInfectious Disease
dc.subjectInfluenza Humans
dc.subjectVirus Diseases
dc.titlePandemic influenza: implications for preparation and delivery of critical care services
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleJournal of intensive care medicine
dc.source.volume26
dc.source.issue6
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/infdis_pp/207
dc.identifier.contextkey7910522
html.description.abstract<p>In a 5-week span during the 1918 influenza A pandemic, more than 2000 patients were admitted to Cook County Hospital in Chicago, with a diagnosis of either influenza or pneumonia; 642 patients, approximately 31% of those admitted, died, with deaths occurring predominantly in patients of age 25 to 30 years. This review summarizes basic information on the biology, epidemiology, control, treatment and prevention of influenza overall, and then addresses the potential impact of pandemic influenza in an intensive care unit setting. Issues that require consideration include workforce staffing and safety, resource management, alternate sites of care surge of patients, altered standards of care, and crisis communication.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathinfdis_pp/207
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Emergency Medicine
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases and Immunology
dc.source.pages347-67


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