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dc.contributor.authorVijayakumar, Elamana
dc.contributor.authorBosscher, Hemmo
dc.contributor.authorRenzi, Francis F.
dc.contributor.authorBaker, Stephen P.
dc.contributor.authorHeard, Stephen O.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:09:11.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T16:20:33Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T16:20:33Z
dc.date.issued1998-04-29
dc.date.submitted2008-05-12
dc.identifier.citationJ Crit Care. 1998 Mar;13(1):1-6.
dc.identifier.issn0883-9441 (Print)
dc.identifier.pmid9556120
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/35309
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between the occurrence of a difficult intubation and (1) the use of neuromuscular blocking agents (NMB) and (2) the presence of airway injuries. It is a retrospective analysis of data from a trauma registry. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Registry records of patients (n = 160) who required emergent endotracheal intubation or establishment of a surgical airway over a 3.5-year period in the emergency department were reviewed. Risk factors for difficult intubations were identified and analyzed using multivariate logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: NMB were used in 75% of patients requiring intubation. Fifteen percent of the intubations were considered difficult. No association was found between the presence of airway injuries and difficult intubations; however, the use of succinylcholine was associated with a lower risk of difficult intubations compared with intubations where a nondepolarizing NMB was used. CONCLUSIONS: The use of succinylcholine may result in fewer difficult intubations in the trauma patient than when a nondepolarizing NMB is used. The presence of airway injuries did not appear to predispose to difficult intubations.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=9556120&dopt=Abstract ">Link to article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.mdconsult.com/das/journal/view/0/N/10268175?ja=965701&PAGE=1.html&issn=0883-9441&source=
dc.subjectAdult
dc.subject*Emergency Treatment
dc.subject*Facial Injuries
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subject*Intubation, Intratracheal
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectNeuromuscular Depolarizing Agents
dc.subjectNeuromuscular Nondepolarizing Agents
dc.subjectRegistries
dc.subjectRespiratory System
dc.subjectRetrospective Studies
dc.subjectSuccinylcholine
dc.subjectVecuronium Bromide
dc.subjectAnesthesiology
dc.subjectEmergency Medicine
dc.subjectLife Sciences
dc.subjectMedicine and Health Sciences
dc.titleThe use of neuromuscular blocking agents in the emergency department to facilitate tracheal intubation in the trauma patient: help or hindrance
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleJournal of critical care
dc.source.volume13
dc.source.issue1
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/infoservices/55
dc.identifier.contextkey507537
html.description.abstract<p>PURPOSE: The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between the occurrence of a difficult intubation and (1) the use of neuromuscular blocking agents (NMB) and (2) the presence of airway injuries. It is a retrospective analysis of data from a trauma registry.</p> <p>MATERIALS AND METHODS: Registry records of patients (n = 160) who required emergent endotracheal intubation or establishment of a surgical airway over a 3.5-year period in the emergency department were reviewed. Risk factors for difficult intubations were identified and analyzed using multivariate logistic regression analysis.</p> <p>RESULTS: NMB were used in 75% of patients requiring intubation. Fifteen percent of the intubations were considered difficult. No association was found between the presence of airway injuries and difficult intubations; however, the use of succinylcholine was associated with a lower risk of difficult intubations compared with intubations where a nondepolarizing NMB was used.</p> <p>CONCLUSIONS: The use of succinylcholine may result in fewer difficult intubations in the trauma patient than when a nondepolarizing NMB is used. The presence of airway injuries did not appear to predispose to difficult intubations.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathinfoservices/55
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Emergency Medicine
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Anesthesiology
dc.contributor.departmentInformation Services, Academic Computing Services
dc.source.pages1-6


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