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dc.contributor.authorSullivan-Bolyai, Susan
dc.contributor.authorBova, Carol A.
dc.contributor.authorLeung, Katherine
dc.contributor.authorTrudeau, Allison
dc.contributor.authorLee, Mary M.
dc.contributor.authorGruppuso, Philip
dc.date2022-08-11T08:09:16.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T16:24:10Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T16:24:10Z
dc.date.issued2010-01-18
dc.date.submitted2011-03-17
dc.identifier.citationDiabetes Educ. 2010 Jan-Feb;36(1):88-97. Epub 2009 Dec 16. <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0145721709352384">Link to article on publisher's site</a>
dc.identifier.issn0145-7217 (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0145721709352384
dc.identifier.pmid20016058
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/36062
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to test the efficacy of a social support intervention with parents of children <13 years old newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes mellitus>(T1DM). METHODS: For this randomized, controlled clinical trial, 10 parent mentors of children diagnosed with T1DM >or=1 year and 60 parent participants were recruited from 2 pediatric diabetes centers. Mentors were trained to provide social support (home visits and phone calls) for 12 months to families in the experimental arm (32 mothers). Control group parents (28 mothers) received the phone number of an experienced parent (not trained to give social support) to call as needed. FINDINGS: Mothers in the experimental and control arms differed at baseline only in birth order of the child with T1DM. The 2 groups did not differ significantly at 3, 6, or 12 months in parent concern, confidence, worry, impact on the family, or perceived social support. Mothers in the experimental arm identified the parent mentor as someone they would seek for advice and issues regarding growth and development, sleep, eating habits, and identification of community agencies. Parent mentors consistently referred mothers to health care providers for advice on medications and treatments but helped them incorporate this advice into day-to-day management. CONCLUSION: Mothers in the experimental arm valued the mentors' help in adjusting to the diagnosis, but this value was not measured by the study instruments. Focus group research is under way to clarify the concept of parent mentor social support and to develop a social support measurement tool.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=20016058&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0145721709352384
dc.subjectAdult
dc.subjectAttitude to Health
dc.subjectChild
dc.subjectChild, Preschool
dc.subjectDiabetes Mellitus, Type 1
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectMentors
dc.subjectMothers
dc.subjectParents
dc.subjectPatient Selection
dc.subjectPower (Psychology)
dc.subject*Social Support
dc.subjectNursing
dc.subjectPediatrics
dc.titleSocial Support to Empower Parents (STEP): an intervention for parents of young children newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleThe Diabetes educator
dc.source.volume36
dc.source.issue1
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/lee/4
dc.identifier.contextkey1882677
html.description.abstract<p>PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to test the efficacy of a social support intervention with parents of children <13 years old newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes mellitus>(T1DM).</p> <p>METHODS: For this randomized, controlled clinical trial, 10 parent mentors of children diagnosed with T1DM >or=1 year and 60 parent participants were recruited from 2 pediatric diabetes centers. Mentors were trained to provide social support (home visits and phone calls) for 12 months to families in the experimental arm (32 mothers). Control group parents (28 mothers) received the phone number of an experienced parent (not trained to give social support) to call as needed.</p> <p>FINDINGS: Mothers in the experimental and control arms differed at baseline only in birth order of the child with T1DM. The 2 groups did not differ significantly at 3, 6, or 12 months in parent concern, confidence, worry, impact on the family, or perceived social support. Mothers in the experimental arm identified the parent mentor as someone they would seek for advice and issues regarding growth and development, sleep, eating habits, and identification of community agencies. Parent mentors consistently referred mothers to health care providers for advice on medications and treatments but helped them incorporate this advice into day-to-day management.</p> <p>CONCLUSION: Mothers in the experimental arm valued the mentors' help in adjusting to the diagnosis, but this value was not measured by the study instruments. Focus group research is under way to clarify the concept of parent mentor social support and to develop a social support measurement tool.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathlee/4
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Cell Biology
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Pediatrics
dc.contributor.departmentGraduate School of Nursing
dc.source.pages88-97


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