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dc.contributor.authorGurwitz, Jerry H.
dc.contributor.authorField, Terry S.
dc.contributor.authorJudge, James
dc.contributor.authorRochon, Paula A.
dc.contributor.authorHarrold, Leslie R.
dc.contributor.authorCadoret, Cynthia A.
dc.contributor.authorLee, Monica
dc.contributor.authorWhite, Kathleen
dc.contributor.authorLaPrino, Jane
dc.contributor.authorErramuspe-Mainard, Janet
dc.contributor.authorDeFlorio, Martin
dc.contributor.authorGavendo, Linda
dc.contributor.authorAuger, Jill C.
dc.contributor.authorBates, David W.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:09:21.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T16:27:38Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T16:27:38Z
dc.date.issued2005-03-01
dc.date.submitted2009-09-29
dc.identifier.citationAm J Med. 2005 Mar;118(3):251-8.
dc.identifier.issn0002-9343
dc.identifier.pmid15745723
dc.identifier.pmid15745723
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/36832
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: To assess the incidence of and risk factors for adverse drug events in the long-term care setting. METHODS: We performed a cohort study of all long-stay residents of two academic long-term care facilities over a period of up to 9 months during 2000 to 2001. We assessed the number of adverse drug events, the severity of events (classified as less serious, serious, life threatening, or fatal), and whether the events were preventable. A case-control study was nested within the prospective study to identify resident-level risk factors for the occurrence of adverse drug events. RESULTS: There were 815 adverse drug events, of which 42% were judged preventable. The overall rate of adverse drug events was 9.8 per 100 resident-months, with a rate of 4.1 preventable adverse drug events per 100 resident-months. Errors associated with preventable events occurred most often at the stages of ordering and monitoring. Residents taking medications in several drug categories were at increased risk of a preventable adverse event. In multivariate analyses, the adjusted odds ratio was 3.4 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.0 to 5.9) for those taking antipsychotic agents, 2.8 (95% CI: 1.6 to 4.7) for those taking anticoagulants, 2.2 (95% CI: 1.2 to 4.0) for those taking diuretics, and 2.0 (95% CI: 1.1 to 3.7) for those taking antiepileptics. CONCLUSION: Our findings reinforce the need for a special focus on the ordering and monitoring stages of pharmaceutical care for preventing adverse drug events in the long-term care setting. Patients taking antipsychotic agents, anticoagulants, diuretics, and antiepileptics are at increased risk.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherExcerpta Medica
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=15745723&dopt=Abstract">Link to article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amjmed.2004.09.018
dc.subjectAged
dc.subjectAged, 80 and over
dc.subjectDrug Interactions
dc.subjectEpidemiologic Methods
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectLong-Term Care
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectMedication Errors
dc.subjectNursing Homes
dc.subjectPharmaceutical Preparations
dc.subjectHealth Services Research
dc.subjectMedicine and Health Sciences
dc.titleThe incidence of adverse drug events in two large academic long-term care facilities.
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleThe American journal of medicine
dc.source.volume118
dc.source.issue3
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/meyers_pp/198
dc.identifier.contextkey1020108
html.description.abstract<p>PURPOSE: To assess the incidence of and risk factors for adverse drug events in the long-term care setting.</p> <p>METHODS: We performed a cohort study of all long-stay residents of two academic long-term care facilities over a period of up to 9 months during 2000 to 2001. We assessed the number of adverse drug events, the severity of events (classified as less serious, serious, life threatening, or fatal), and whether the events were preventable. A case-control study was nested within the prospective study to identify resident-level risk factors for the occurrence of adverse drug events.</p> <p>RESULTS: There were 815 adverse drug events, of which 42% were judged preventable. The overall rate of adverse drug events was 9.8 per 100 resident-months, with a rate of 4.1 preventable adverse drug events per 100 resident-months. Errors associated with preventable events occurred most often at the stages of ordering and monitoring. Residents taking medications in several drug categories were at increased risk of a preventable adverse event. In multivariate analyses, the adjusted odds ratio was 3.4 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.0 to 5.9) for those taking antipsychotic agents, 2.8 (95% CI: 1.6 to 4.7) for those taking anticoagulants, 2.2 (95% CI: 1.2 to 4.0) for those taking diuretics, and 2.0 (95% CI: 1.1 to 3.7) for those taking antiepileptics.</p> <p>CONCLUSION: Our findings reinforce the need for a special focus on the ordering and monitoring stages of pharmaceutical care for preventing adverse drug events in the long-term care setting. Patients taking antipsychotic agents, anticoagulants, diuretics, and antiepileptics are at increased risk.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathmeyers_pp/198
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medicine, Division of Geriatric Medicine
dc.contributor.departmentMeyers Primary Care Institute


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