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dc.contributor.authorStille, Christopher J.
dc.contributor.authorChristison-Lagay, Joan
dc.contributor.authorBernstein, Bruce A.
dc.contributor.authorDworkin, Paul H.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:09:22.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T16:28:06Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T16:28:06Z
dc.date.issued2001-07-01
dc.date.submitted2011-12-14
dc.identifier.citationStille CJ, Christison-Legay J, Bernstein B, Dworkin PH. A simple provider-based educational intervention to boost infant immunization rates: A controlled trial. Clinical Pediatrics 2001;40:365-73. <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/000992280104000701 ">Link to article on publisher's website</a>
dc.identifier.issn0009-9228
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/000992280104000701
dc.identifier.pmid11491130
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/36940
dc.description.abstractWe sought to determine if a simple educational intervention initiated at the first well-child care visit, with reinforcement at subsequent visits, can improve inner-city infant immunization rates. We conducted a controlled trial involving 315 newborn infants and their primary caregivers in 3 inner-city primary care centers. Child health care providers gave caregivers in the intervention group an interactive graphic card with verbal reinforcement. At later visits, stickers were applied to the card when immunizations were given. Routine information was given to controls. After the trial, age-appropriate immunization rates at 7 months were 58% in each group. Intervention infants had 50% fewer missed opportunities to immunize (p=0.01) but cancelled 77% more appointments (p=0.04) than controls. We conclude that a brief educational intervention at the first well-child care visit did not boost 7-month immunization rates, although it was associated with fewer missed opportunities to immunize.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherWestminster Publications
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=11491130&dopt=Abstract">Link to article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttp://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&CSC=Y&NEWS=N&PAGE=fulltext&AN=00003094-200107000-00001&LSLINK=80&D=ovft
dc.subjectAnalysis of Variance
dc.subjectCase-Control Studies
dc.subjectCommunicable Disease Control
dc.subjectEducational Status
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectHealth Education
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectImmunization Programs
dc.subjectInfant
dc.subjectInfant, Newborn
dc.subjectIntervention Studies
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectPoverty
dc.subjectProbability
dc.subjectRisk Assessment
dc.subjectRisk Factors
dc.subjectSocioeconomic Factors
dc.subjectUnited States
dc.subjectUrban Population
dc.subjectVaccination
dc.subjectHealth Services Research
dc.subjectPrimary Care
dc.titleA simple provider-based educational intervention to boost infant immunization rates: a controlled trial
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleClinical pediatrics
dc.source.volume40
dc.source.issue7
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/meyers_pp/327
dc.identifier.contextkey2403102
html.description.abstract<p>We sought to determine if a simple educational intervention initiated at the first well-child care visit, with reinforcement at subsequent visits, can improve inner-city infant immunization rates. We conducted a controlled trial involving 315 newborn infants and their primary caregivers in 3 inner-city primary care centers. Child health care providers gave caregivers in the intervention group an interactive graphic card with verbal reinforcement. At later visits, stickers were applied to the card when immunizations were given. Routine information was given to controls. After the trial, age-appropriate immunization rates at 7 months were 58% in each group. Intervention infants had 50% fewer missed opportunities to immunize (p=0.01) but cancelled 77% more appointments (p=0.04) than controls. We conclude that a brief educational intervention at the first well-child care visit did not boost 7-month immunization rates, although it was associated with fewer missed opportunities to immunize.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathmeyers_pp/327
dc.contributor.departmentMeyers Primary Care Institute
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Pediatrics
dc.source.pages365-73


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