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dc.contributor.authorStuart, Bruce C.
dc.contributor.authorBriesacher, Becky A.
dc.contributor.authorDoshi, Jalpa A.
dc.contributor.authorWrobel, Marian V.
dc.contributor.authorBaysac, Fatima S.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:09:22.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T16:28:30Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T16:28:30Z
dc.date.issued2007-06-01
dc.date.submitted2011-12-27
dc.identifier.citationBruce C. Stuart, Becky A. Briesacher, Jalpa A. Doshi, Marian V. Wrobel, and Fatima Baysac (2007) Will Part D Produce Savings in Part A and Part B? The Impact of Prescription Drug Coverage on Medicare Program Expenditures. Inquiry: June 2007, Vol. 44, No. 2, pp. 146-156. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.5034/inquiryjrnl_44.2.146
dc.identifier.doi10.5034/inquiryjrnl_44.2.146
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/37031
dc.description.abstractThis paper addresses the question of whether prescription drug coverage for Medicare beneficiaries is associated with lower spending for hospital and physician services. We discuss the theoretical rationale for this relationship and the empirical challenges in estimating it. We then test the hypothesis using data from the 1999 and 2000 Medicare Current Beneficiary Surveys. Our results suggest that while drug coverage significantly increases spending on medications, there is no consistent evidence of increases or decreases in Medicare spending for hospital or physician services. We conclude that the cost of the new Medicare Part D drug benefit is unlikely to produce cost offsets elsewhere in the program.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.5034/inquiryjrnl_44.2.146
dc.subjectMedicare
dc.subjectMedicare Part D
dc.subjectPrescription Drugs
dc.subjectHealth Services Research
dc.subjectPrimary Care
dc.titleWill Part D Produce Savings in Part A and Part B? The Impact of Prescription Drug Coverage on Medicare Program Expenditures
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleInquiry
dc.source.volume44
dc.source.issue2
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/meyers_pp/418
dc.identifier.contextkey2424650
html.description.abstract<p>This paper addresses the question of whether prescription drug coverage for Medicare beneficiaries is associated with lower spending for hospital and physician services. We discuss the theoretical rationale for this relationship and the empirical challenges in estimating it. We then test the hypothesis using data from the 1999 and 2000 Medicare Current Beneficiary Surveys. Our results suggest that while drug coverage significantly increases spending on medications, there is no consistent evidence of increases or decreases in Medicare spending for hospital or physician services. We conclude that the cost of the new Medicare Part D drug benefit is unlikely to produce cost offsets elsewhere in the program.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathmeyers_pp/418
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medicine, Division of Geriatric Medicine
dc.contributor.departmentMeyers Primary Care Institute
dc.source.pages146-156


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